D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Social Sciences and Humanities D-index 39 Citations 7,534 141 World Ranking 2337 National Ranking 52

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • World War II
  • Law
  • Capitalism

His primary areas of investigation include Standard of living, Demography, Anthropometry, Economy and Welfare. John Komlos has included themes like Quantile, Social inequality, Prosperity and Development economics in his Standard of living study. His Demography study incorporates themes from Agriculture, Military personnel and Socioeconomics.

His Anthropometry study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Manifesto and Gerontology. His work deals with themes such as Productivity, Property rights, Inference and Industrial Revolution, which intersect with Economy. His Welfare study combines topics in areas such as Regression analysis, Safety net, Educational attainment, Social science and Fall of man.

His most cited work include:

  • Shrinking in a Growing Economy? The Mystery of Physical Stature during the Industrial Revolution (377 citations)
  • The Height and Weight of West Point Cadets: Dietary Change in Antebellum America (240 citations)
  • Looking Backward and Looking Forward: Anthropometric Research and the Development of Social Science History (208 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Demography, Standard of living, Anthropometry, Economic history and Population growth. His Demography research includes elements of Ethnic group and Welfare. The concepts of his Standard of living study are interwoven with issues in Demographic economics, Per capita income, Social inequality, Development economics and Socioeconomics.

His Economic history study frequently involves adjacent topics like Monarchy. His work on Malthusian trap is typically connected to Industrial Revolution, Capital, Capital accumulation and Urbanization as part of general Population growth study, connecting several disciplines of science. His Economy research extends to the thematically linked field of Industrial Revolution.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Demography (29.92%)
  • Standard of living (23.11%)
  • Anthropometry (19.32%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Demographic economics (7.58%)
  • Welfare (10.23%)
  • Demography (29.92%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

John Komlos focuses on Demographic economics, Welfare, Demography, Nutritional status and Capitalist development. His Demographic economics research includes themes of Industrial society, Industrial Revolution, Agriculture, Distribution and Spite. His multidisciplinary approach integrates Demography and Birth cohort in his work.

John Komlos undertakes multidisciplinary studies into Birth cohort and Standard of living in his work. John Komlos works mostly in the field of Standard of living, limiting it down to concerns involving Cash crop and, occasionally, Human capital. The study incorporates disciplines such as Social status and Great Depression in addition to Anthropometry.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Has Creative Destruction become more Destructive (13 citations)
  • Clarifications of a Puzzle: The Decline in Nutritional Status at the Onset of Modern Economic Growth in the United States (12 citations)
  • What Every Economics Student Needs to Know and Doesn't Get in the Usual Principles Text (12 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • World War II
  • Law
  • Capitalism

His primary scientific interests are in Anthropometry, Nutritional status, Demographic economics, Birth cohort and Technological change. He has researched Anthropometry in several fields, including Prison, Demography, Social status and Great Depression. His Demographic economics research integrates issues from Industrial society, Subject, Distribution, Economic inequality and Middle class.

His research integrates issues of Population growth and American population in his study of Birth cohort. His Technological change research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Inflation rate, Welfare, Price index and Creative destruction, Neoclassical economics. His Welfare research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Optimism, Political process and Keynesian economics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Shrinking in a Growing Economy? The Mystery of Physical Stature during the Industrial Revolution

John Komlos.
The Journal of Economic History (1998)

554 Citations

Nutrition and Economic Development in the Eighteenth-Century Habsburg Monarchy: An Anthropometric History

John Komlos.
(1989)

397 Citations

Stature, Living Standards, and Economic Development: Essays in Anthropometric History

John Komlos.
Research Papers in Economics (1994)

362 Citations

The Height and Weight of West Point Cadets: Dietary Change in Antebellum America

John Komlos.
The Journal of Economic History (1987)

355 Citations

Nutrition and Economic Development in the Eighteenth-Century Habsburg Monarchy

John Komlos.
(2017)

324 Citations

OBESITY AND THE RATE OF TIME PREFERENCE: IS THERE A CONNECTION?

John Komlos;Patricia K. Smith;Barry Bogin.
Journal of Biosocial Science (2004)

320 Citations

From the tallest to (one of) the fattest: the enigmatic fate of the American population in the 20th century.

John Komlos;Marieluise Baur.
Economics and Human Biology (2004)

309 Citations

Stature and nutrition in the Habsburg monarchy: the standard of living and economic development in the eighteenth century.

John Komlos.
The American Historical Review (1985)

241 Citations

The secular trend in the biological standard of living in the United Kingdom, 1730-1860

John Komlos.
The Economic History Review (1993)

234 Citations

Looking Backward and Looking Forward: Anthropometric Research and the Development of Social Science History

John Komlos;Jorg Baten.
Social Science History (2004)

208 Citations

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