H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Immunology D-index 48 Citations 6,017 91 World Ranking 2880 National Ranking 1366

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Virus
  • Disease
  • Gene

His primary areas of investigation include Virology, Dengue fever, Virus, Flavivirus and Dengue virus. His research in Virology intersects with topics in Genetics and Immunology. Douglas M. Watts has included themes like Viral disease, Serotype, Immunohistochemistry and Serology in his Dengue fever study.

His Virus research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Taxon and Genome. His Flavivirus study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Flaviviridae, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, Subgenus and Antibody. His work carried out in the field of Dengue virus brings together such families of science as Epidemiology, Antigen, Polyclonal antibodies, Molecular biology and Virus quantification.

His most cited work include:

  • Dengue Virus Structural Differences That Correlate with Pathogenesis (536 citations)
  • Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical syndrome and genetic diversity. (369 citations)
  • Failure of secondary infection with American genotype dengue 2 to cause dengue haemorrhagic fever (271 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Virology, Virus, Dengue fever, Immunology and Antibody are his primary areas of study. His work on Serology expands to the thematically related Virology. His Virus research includes themes of Transmission and Prevalence.

The Dengue fever study combines topics in areas such as Arbovirus, Vector, Yellow fever and Serotype. His Immunology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Syphilis, Epidemiology and Chills. His Antibody research incorporates elements of Infectivity, Western blot and Antigen.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Virology (76.16%)
  • Virus (36.63%)
  • Dengue fever (21.51%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2015-2021)?

  • Virology (76.16%)
  • Enzootic (7.56%)
  • Transmission (9.88%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Douglas M. Watts focuses on Virology, Enzootic, Transmission, Chikungunya and Rift Valley fever. His Virology study frequently draws parallels with other fields, such as Antibody. His Enzootic research integrates issues from Plaque reduction neutralization test, Seroprevalence and Outbreak.

His studies examine the connections between Transmission and genetics, as well as such issues in Sylvatic cycle, with regards to Herd immunity and Host. The concepts of his Rift Valley fever study are interwoven with issues in Attenuated vaccine, Antibody titer and Immunogenicity. His studies deal with areas such as RNA, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Rhabdoviridae and Dengue virus as well as Flavivirus.

Between 2015 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Role of monkeys in the sylvatic cycle of chikungunya virus in Senegal (28 citations)
  • Role of monkeys in the sylvatic cycle of chikungunya virus in Senegal (28 citations)
  • Characterization of Three New Insect-Specific Flaviviruses: Their Relationship to the Mosquito-Borne Flavivirus Pathogens. (25 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Virus
  • Disease
  • Gene

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Virology, Flavivirus, Arbovirus, Sylvatic cycle and Chikungunya. His research in Virology is mostly concerned with Dengue virus. His Dengue virus research focuses on Infectivity and how it connects with Rhabdoviridae.

His study in Arbovirus is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Transmission, Enzootic, Host and Herd immunity. The various areas that Douglas M. Watts examines in his Sequence analysis study include Serotype, Virus classification, Genome, Orthobunyavirus and Cache-Valley virus. Douglas M. Watts has researched Insect in several fields, including Tropical medicine, Key and Culex flavivirus.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Dengue Virus Structural Differences That Correlate with Pathogenesis

Katrin C. Leitmeyer;David W. Vaughn;Douglas M. Watts;Rosalba Salas.
Journal of Virology (1999)

838 Citations

Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever: history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical syndrome and genetic diversity.

Dennis A. Bente;Naomi L. Forrester;Douglas M. Watts;Alexander J. McAuley.
Antiviral Research (2013)

547 Citations

Failure of secondary infection with American genotype dengue 2 to cause dengue haemorrhagic fever

Douglas M Watts;Kevin R Porter;Pavithat Putvatana;Bruno Vasquez.
The Lancet (1999)

415 Citations

Haiti: absence of dengue hemorrhagic fever despite hyperendemic dengue virus transmission.

Scott B. Halstead;Thomas G. Streit;Jack Guy Lafontant;Ravithat Putvatana.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (2001)

277 Citations

Development and Evaluation of Serotype- and Group-Specific Fluorogenic Reverse Transcriptase PCR (TaqMan) Assays for Dengue Virus

Johnny D. Callahan;Shuenn-Jue L. Wu;Amanda Dion-Schultz;Beverly E. Mangold.
Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2001)

266 Citations

Temporal and Geographic Patterns of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Production in Iquitos, Peru

Amy C. Morrison;Kenneth Gray;Arthur Getis;Helvio Astete.
Journal of Medical Entomology (2004)

228 Citations

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Infection of Mice Transgenic for the Human Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 Virus Receptor

Chien Te K. Tseng;Cheng Huang;Patrick Newman;Nan Wang.
Journal of Virology (2007)

227 Citations

Demonstration of yellow fever and dengue antigens in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded human liver by immunohistochemical analysis.

William C. Hall;Thomas P. Crowell;Douglas M. Watts;Vera L. R. Barros.
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (1991)

211 Citations

Effect of dengue-1 antibodies on American dengue-2 viral infection and dengue haemorrhagic fever

Tadeusz J Kochel;Douglas M Watts;Scott B Halstead;Curtis G Hayes.
The Lancet (2002)

206 Citations

Epidemiology of dengue virus in Iquitos, Peru 1999 to 2005: interepidemic and epidemic patterns of transmission.

Amy C. Morrison;Sharon L. Minnick;Claudio Rocha;Brett M. Forshey.
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases (2010)

205 Citations

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Best Scientists Citing Douglas M. Watts

Scott C. Weaver

Scott C. Weaver

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Publications: 128

Thomas W. Scott

Thomas W. Scott

University of California, Davis

Publications: 105

Amy C. Morrison

Amy C. Morrison

University of California, Davis

Publications: 85

Robert B. Tesh

Robert B. Tesh

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Publications: 61

Eva Harris

Eva Harris

University of California, Berkeley

Publications: 52

Edward C. Holmes

Edward C. Holmes

University of Sydney

Publications: 49

Alan D.T. Barrett

Alan D.T. Barrett

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Publications: 45

Nikos Vasilakis

Nikos Vasilakis

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Publications: 45

Joseph M. Vinetz

Joseph M. Vinetz

Yale University

Publications: 43

María G. Guzmán

María G. Guzmán

Instituto de Medicina Tropical “Pedro Kourí”

Publications: 43

Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

State University of Pará

Publications: 41

Uriel Kitron

Uriel Kitron

Emory University

Publications: 39

Scott B. Halstead

Scott B. Halstead

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences

Publications: 34

Ali Mirazimi

Ali Mirazimi

Karolinska Institute

Publications: 33

Barry J. Beaty

Barry J. Beaty

Colorado State University

Publications: 33

Roger Hewson

Roger Hewson

Public Health England

Publications: 32

Something went wrong. Please try again later.