H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 44 Citations 10,917 65 World Ranking 13472 National Ranking 5733

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Apoptosis
  • Internal medicine

His scientific interests lie mostly in Cell biology, Neuroscience, Apoptosis, Excitotoxicity and Amyloid precursor protein. His study in Cell biology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Synaptic plasticity, Receptor and Presenilin. His Neuroscience study incorporates themes from Alzheimer's disease, Brain aging, Gene and Amyloid.

The study incorporates disciplines such as Gamma secretase, Surgery and Ischemic stroke in addition to Apoptosis. His research in Excitotoxicity intersects with topics in Ryanodine receptor, Endocrinology and Calcium signaling. His Endocrinology research includes themes of Gustducin and Lactisole.

His most cited work include:

  • Gut-expressed gustducin and taste receptors regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (779 citations)
  • Homocysteine Elicits a DNA Damage Response in Neurons That Promotes Apoptosis and Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxicity (661 citations)
  • Calcium signaling in the ER: its role in neuronal plasticity and neurodegenerative disorders (453 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Cell biology, Apoptosis, Internal medicine, Endocrinology and Neuroscience. His Cell biology study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Oxidative stress, Presenilin and Amyloid precursor protein. Sic L. Chan has included themes like Molecular biology and Immunology in his Apoptosis study.

His Neuroscience study combines topics in areas such as Synaptic plasticity, Neurotrophic factors, Kainic acid and Amyloid. Sic L. Chan works mostly in the field of Excitotoxicity, limiting it down to concerns involving Ryanodine receptor and, occasionally, Transfection and Stimulation. His studies deal with areas such as Calcium and Mitochondrion as well as Endoplasmic reticulum.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Cell biology (52.08%)
  • Apoptosis (25.00%)
  • Internal medicine (26.04%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2010-2021)?

  • Cell biology (52.08%)
  • Endocrinology (26.04%)
  • Internal medicine (26.04%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Cell biology, Endocrinology, Internal medicine, Unfolded protein response and Pharmacology are his primary areas of study. His Cell biology research is mostly focused on the topic Notch signaling pathway. His Endocrinology research includes elements of Neurogenesis, CREB, Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein and Nicotine.

Sic L. Chan has researched Internal medicine in several fields, including Transcription factor, Gene expression and Neuroscience. Sic L. Chan combines subjects such as Cancer research and Glioblastoma with his study of Unfolded protein response. His Amyloid precursor protein secretase research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Receptor, Oxidative stress and Biochemistry.

Between 2010 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Notch Activation Enhances the Microglia-Mediated Inflammatory Response Associated With Focal Cerebral Ischemia (93 citations)
  • Evidence that gamma-secretase-mediated Notch signaling induces neuronal cell death via the nuclear factor-kappaB-Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death pathway in ischemic stroke. (62 citations)
  • Oxidative lipid modification of nicastrin enhances amyloidogenic γ-secretase activity in Alzheimer's disease. (58 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Apoptosis
  • Internal medicine

His primary scientific interests are in Cell biology, Notch signaling pathway, Lipid modification, Alzheimer's disease and Receptor. Particularly relevant to Signal transduction is his body of work in Cell biology. The concepts of his Signal transduction study are interwoven with issues in Caspase, Programmed cell death and Gamma secretase.

Amyloid precursor protein, Biochemistry, Lipid peroxidation, Nicastrin and Oxidative stress are fields of study that intersect with his Lipid modification research. A large part of his Alzheimer's disease studies is devoted to Amyloid precursor protein secretase. His work carried out in the field of Gene knockdown brings together such families of science as Neuroprotection, Neuroregeneration, Pathology and Brain ischemia, Ischemia.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Gut-expressed gustducin and taste receptors regulate secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1

Hyeung-Jin Jang;Zaza Kokrashvili;Michael J. Theodorakis;Olga D. Carlson.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007)

997 Citations

Homocysteine Elicits a DNA Damage Response in Neurons That Promotes Apoptosis and Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxicity

Inna I. Kruman;Carsten Culmsee;Sic L. Chan;Yuri Kruman.
The Journal of Neuroscience (2000)

942 Citations

Calcium signaling in the ER: its role in neuronal plasticity and neurodegenerative disorders

Mark P Mattson;Frank M LaFerla;Sic L Chan;Malcolm A Leissring.
Trends in Neurosciences (2000)

699 Citations

Caspase and calpain substrates: Roles in synaptic plasticity and cell death

Sic L. Chan;Mark P. Mattson.
Journal of Neuroscience Research (1999)

614 Citations

Neuronal and glial calcium signaling in Alzheimer's disease.

Mark P Mattson;Mark P Mattson;Sic L Chan.
Cell Calcium (2003)

587 Citations

Calcium orchestrates apoptosis.

Mark P Mattson;Sic L Chan.
Nature Cell Biology (2003)

570 Citations

Disruption of neurogenesis by amyloid β-peptide, and perturbed neural progenitor cell homeostasis, in models of Alzheimer's disease

Norman J. Haughey;Avindra Nath;Sic L. Chan;A. C. Borchard.
Journal of Neurochemistry (2002)

566 Citations

Modification of Brain Aging and Neurodegenerative Disorders by Genes, Diet, and Behavior

Mark P. Mattson;Sic L. Chan;Wenzhen Duan.
Physiological Reviews (2002)

550 Citations

Cell Cycle Activation Linked to Neuronal Cell Death Initiated by DNA Damage

Inna I Kruman;Robert P Wersto;Fernando Cardozo-Pelaez;Lubomir Smilenov.
Neuron (2004)

448 Citations

DAPK1 Interaction with NMDA Receptor NR2B Subunits Mediates Brain Damage in Stroke

Weihong Tu;Xin Xu;Lisheng Peng;Xiaofen Zhong.
Cell (2010)

426 Citations

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