D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 81 Citations 30,328 199 World Ranking 257 National Ranking 100

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2019 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2014 - Fellow of the Ecological Society of America (ESA)

2013 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Biodiversity
  • Ecosystem

Richard S. Ostfeld mainly focuses on Ecology, Biodiversity, Lyme disease, Disease and Ecosystem. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Infectious disease and Population density. His Biodiversity research incorporates elements of Agriculture, Ecology, Conservation biology and Habitat.

His study in Lyme disease is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Ixodidae, Ixodes scapularis, Borrelia burgdorferi and Tick. His work deals with themes such as Communicable disease transmission, Biota and Transmission, which intersect with Disease. His Ecosystem research focuses on Community structure and how it relates to Ecological systems theory, Species evenness, Diversity index and Host.

His most cited work include:

  • Climate Warming and Disease Risks for Terrestrial and Marine Biota (1889 citations)
  • Impacts of biodiversity on the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases (1031 citations)
  • Effects of species diversity on disease risk. (955 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Ecology, Lyme disease, Tick, Ixodes scapularis and Peromyscus are his primary areas of study. Many of his studies involve connections with topics such as Population density and Ecology. His research integrates issues of Vector, Host, Borrelia burgdorferi and Acorn in his study of Lyme disease.

He has included themes like Babesiosis and Wildlife in his Tick study. His studies deal with areas such as Nymph, Parasitiformes and Abundance as well as Ixodes scapularis. His Biodiversity research incorporates themes from Infectious disease, Disease and Species diversity.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (64.75%)
  • Lyme disease (23.75%)
  • Tick (22.22%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2013-2021)?

  • Ecology (64.75%)
  • Tick (22.22%)
  • Ixodes scapularis (21.46%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Richard S. Ostfeld spends much of his time researching Ecology, Tick, Ixodes scapularis, Lyme disease and Zoology. His research in Ecology intersects with topics in Infectious disease and Zoonotic disease. While the research belongs to areas of Tick, Richard S. Ostfeld spends his time largely on the problem of Disease reservoir, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Host specificity.

The various areas that Richard S. Ostfeld examines in his Ixodes scapularis study include Abundance, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesiosis, Peromyscus and Nymph. His Lyme disease research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Landscape dynamics, Borrelia burgdorferi, Host, Typhus and Oak forest. His Biodiversity study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Spatial ecology and Prevalence.

Between 2013 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Climate, environmental and socio-economic change: weighing up the balance in vector-borne disease transmission (163 citations)
  • Effects of environmental change on zoonotic disease risk: an ecological primer (133 citations)
  • Climate change and Ixodes tick-borne diseases of humans (133 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Habitat
  • Ecosystem

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Ecology, Ixodes, Tick, Ixodes scapularis and Disease reservoir. His research on Ecology often connects related areas such as Vertebrate. The concepts of his Ixodes study are interwoven with issues in Global warming and Abiotic component.

His Tick study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Lyme disease and Borrelia burgdorferi. He interconnects Nymph, Powassan virus and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in the investigation of issues within Ixodes scapularis. His Biodiversity study incorporates themes from One Health, Causal chain, Emerging infectious disease and Natural ecosystem.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Climate Warming and Disease Risks for Terrestrial and Marine Biota

C. Drew Harvell;Charles E. Mitchell;Charles E. Mitchell;Jessica R. Ward;Sonia Altizer;Sonia Altizer.
Science (2002)

2717 Citations

Impacts of biodiversity on the emergence and transmission of infectious diseases

Felicia Keesing;Lisa K. Belden;Peter Daszak;Andrew P. Dobson.
Nature (2010)

1372 Citations

Effects of species diversity on disease risk.

F. Keesing;R. D. Holt;R. S. Ostfeld.
Ecology Letters (2006)

1180 Citations

The ecology of infectious disease: Effects of host diversity and community composition on Lyme disease risk

Kathleen LoGiudice;Richard S. Ostfeld;Kenneth A. Schmidt;Felicia Keesing.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2003)

1017 Citations

Spatial epidemiology: an emerging (or re-emerging) discipline

Richard S. Ostfeld;Gregory E. Glass;Felicia Keesing.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2005)

786 Citations

Climate Change and Infectious Diseases: From Evidence to a Predictive Framework

Sonia Altizer;Richard S. Ostfeld;Pieter T. J. Johnson;Susan Kutz.
Science (2013)

774 Citations

Pulsed resources and community dynamics of consumers in terrestrial ecosystems

Richard S. Ostfeld;Felicia Keesing.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2000)

728 Citations

Biodiversity and disease risk : The case of Lyme disease

Richard S. Ostfeld;Felicia Keesing.
Conservation Biology (2000)

683 Citations

Effect of Forest Fragmentation on Lyme Disease Risk

Brian F. Allan;Felicia Keesing;Richard S. Ostfeld.
Conservation Biology (2003)

604 Citations

Of Mice and Mast Ecological connections in eastern deciduous forests

Richard S. Ostfeld;Clive G. Jones;Jerry O. Wolff.
BioScience (1996)

513 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Richard S. Ostfeld

Pieter T. J. Johnson

Pieter T. J. Johnson

University of Colorado Boulder

Publications: 58

Nicholas H. Ogden

Nicholas H. Ogden

Public Health Agency of Canada

Publications: 51

Jason R. Rohr

Jason R. Rohr

University of Notre Dame

Publications: 49

Serge Morand

Serge Morand

Centre national de la recherche scientifique, CNRS

Publications: 46

Rebecca J. Eisen

Rebecca J. Eisen

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Publications: 46

Andrew P. Dobson

Andrew P. Dobson

Princeton University

Publications: 44

Bette L. Willis

Bette L. Willis

James Cook University

Publications: 43

Robert Poulin

Robert Poulin

University of Otago

Publications: 42

Walter D. Koenig

Walter D. Koenig

University of California, Berkeley

Publications: 42

José de la Fuente

José de la Fuente

University of Castilla-La Mancha

Publications: 41

Nils Chr. Stenseth

Nils Chr. Stenseth

University of Oslo

Publications: 37

Hein Sprong

Hein Sprong

Wageningen University & Research

Publications: 36

Meghan A. Duffy

Meghan A. Duffy

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

Publications: 36

Philip Weinstein

Philip Weinstein

University of Adelaide

Publications: 36

Susan J. Kutz

Susan J. Kutz

University of Calgary

Publications: 35

C. Drew Harvell

C. Drew Harvell

Cornell University

Publications: 33

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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