D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Ecology and Evolution D-index 52 Citations 9,844 144 World Ranking 1635 National Ranking 41

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Genetics
  • Gene

His primary scientific interests are in Ecology, Zoology, Scathophaga stercoraria, Sexual selection and Sexual dimorphism. His Cline research extends to Ecology, which is thematically connected. His Zoology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Fecundity and Reproductive success.

He combines subjects such as Avian clutch size, Larva, Scathophagidae, Adaptation and Bergmann's rule with his study of Scathophaga stercoraria. Wolf U. Blanckenhorn interconnects Anatomy, Fecundity selection and Directional selection in the investigation of issues within Sexual selection. His research on Sexual dimorphism focuses in particular on Rensch's rule.

His most cited work include:

  • The evolution of body size: what keeps organisms small? (897 citations)
  • Bergmann and converse bergmann latitudinal clines in arthropods: two ends of a continuum? (514 citations)
  • Behavioral Causes and Consequences of Sexual Size Dimorphism (399 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn mostly deals with Ecology, Zoology, Scathophaga stercoraria, Sexual selection and Scathophagidae. His Zoology study combines topics in areas such as Fecundity and Reproductive success. His Scathophaga stercoraria research integrates issues from Avian clutch size, Reproduction, Natural selection, Larva and Animal science.

His Sexual selection study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Genetics, Fluctuating asymmetry, Fecundity selection and Directional selection. His Scathophagidae research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Pupa, Juvenile, Scathophaga, Veterinary medicine and Sperm. His research investigates the connection with Sexual dimorphism and areas like Genetic correlation which intersect with concerns in Quantitative genetics.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (50.83%)
  • Zoology (40.33%)
  • Scathophaga stercoraria (35.91%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Sepsidae (20.99%)
  • Zoology (40.33%)
  • Evolutionary biology (14.36%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Sepsidae, Zoology, Evolutionary biology, Sexual dimorphism and Sexual selection. His Sepsidae study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Allopatric speciation, Ecological niche, Sympatry, Habitat and Directional selection. Wolf U. Blanckenhorn studies Scathophaga stercoraria, a branch of Zoology.

His studies in Evolutionary biology integrate themes in fields like Interspecific competition, Natural selection, Adaptation, Biological dispersal and Phenotypic plasticity. His Sexual selection research incorporates themes from Mating and Mating system. His Intraspecific competition study is related to the wider topic of Ecology.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The evolution of male-biased sexual size dimorphism is associated with increased body size plasticity in males (21 citations)
  • Does thermal plasticity align with local adaptation? An interspecific comparison of wing morphology in sepsid flies (12 citations)
  • Geographic clines in wing morphology relate to colonization history in New World but not Old World populations of yellow dung flies. (12 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Genetics
  • Gene

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Evolutionary biology, Zoology, Sexual dimorphism, Sepsidae and Ecology. The study incorporates disciplines such as Adaptation, Biological dispersal and Phenotypic plasticity in addition to Evolutionary biology. He works mostly in the field of Adaptation, limiting it down to topics relating to Isolation by distance and, in certain cases, Natural selection, Scathophaga stercoraria and Scathophagidae.

His Zoology research incorporates themes from Fecundity, Reproduction, Larva and Maternal effect. In his work, Body size and Genic capture is strongly intertwined with Sexual selection, which is a subfield of Sexual dimorphism. Many of his research projects under Sepsidae are closely connected to Trait with Trait, tying the diverse disciplines of science together.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The evolution of body size: what keeps organisms small?

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn.
The Quarterly Review of Biology (2000)

1114 Citations

Bergmann and converse bergmann latitudinal clines in arthropods: two ends of a continuum?

W. U. Blanckenhorn;M. Demont.
Integrative and Comparative Biology (2004)

656 Citations

Sex, size, and gender roles : evolutionary studies of sexual size dimorphism

Daphne J. Fairbairn;Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;T. Székely.
(2007)

623 Citations

Behavioral Causes and Consequences of Sexual Size Dimorphism

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn.
Ethology (2005)

548 Citations

Sex, Size and Gender Roles

Daphne J. Fairbairn;Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;Tamás Székely.
(2007)

522 Citations

Sex differences in phenotypic plasticity affect variation in sexual size dimorphism in insects: from physiology to evolution.

R. Craig Stillwell;Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;Tiit Teder;Goggy Davidowitz.
Annual Review of Entomology (2010)

349 Citations

The costs of copulating in the dung fly Sepsis cynipsea

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;David J. Hosken;Oliver Y. Martin;Constanze Reim.
Behavioral Ecology (2002)

289 Citations

WHEN RENSCH MEETS BERGMANN: DOES SEXUAL SIZE DIMORPHISM CHANGE SYSTEMATICALLY WITH LATITUDE?

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;R. Craig Stillwell;Kyle A. Young;Charles W. Fox.
Evolution (2006)

257 Citations

Proximate causes of Rensch's rule: does sexual size dimorphism in arthropods result from sex differences in development time?

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn;Anthony F. G. Dixon;Daphne J. Fairbairn;Matthias W. Foellmer.
The American Naturalist (2007)

242 Citations

ADAPTIVE PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT, AND BODY SIZE IN THE YELLOW DUNG FLY.

Wolf U. Blanckenhorn.
Evolution (1998)

224 Citations

Editorial Boards

Journal of Evolutionary Biology
(Impact Factor: 2.516)

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