H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience H-index 131 Citations 65,432 259 World Ranking 81 National Ranking 12

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2009 - Fellow of the Royal Society, United Kingdom

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Neuroscience
  • Cognition
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging

His main research concerns Neuroscience, Premotor cortex, Posterior parietal cortex, Cognitive psychology and Prefrontal cortex. Neuroscience is closely attributed to Anatomy in his study. His work deals with themes such as Motor cortex and Mirror neuron, which intersect with Premotor cortex.

His research in Posterior parietal cortex intersects with topics in Parietal lobe, Frontal lobe and Cerebral blood flow. His Cognitive psychology research incorporates elements of Visual perception, Perception, Communication, Cognition and Functional magnetic resonance imaging. The various areas that Richard E. Passingham examines in his Prefrontal cortex study include Working memory, Anterior cingulate cortex and Neural correlates of consciousness.

His most cited work include:

  • Action Observation and Acquired Motor Skills: An fMRI Study with Expert Dancers (1397 citations)
  • Motor sequence learning: a study with positron emission tomography (1023 citations)
  • That's My Hand! Activity in Premotor Cortex Reflects Feeling of Ownership of a Limb (944 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Neuroscience, Prefrontal cortex, Cognitive psychology, Posterior parietal cortex and Premotor cortex. Cortex, Working memory, Motor cortex, Supplementary motor area and Human brain are subfields of Neuroscience in which his conducts study. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Stimulus and Brain mapping.

His work carried out in the field of Cognitive psychology brings together such families of science as Developmental psychology, Visual perception, Functional magnetic resonance imaging and Cognition. His Posterior parietal cortex research includes themes of Parietal lobe, Frontal lobe and Sensory system. His Premotor cortex study incorporates themes from Mirror neuron, Sensory cue and Perception.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (67.18%)
  • Prefrontal cortex (32.82%)
  • Cognitive psychology (30.98%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2007-2019)?

  • Neuroscience (67.18%)
  • Prefrontal cortex (32.82%)
  • Cognitive psychology (30.98%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary scientific interests are in Neuroscience, Prefrontal cortex, Cognitive psychology, Posterior parietal cortex and Working memory. His works in Human brain, Cortex, Macaque, Neuroimaging and Functional specialization are all subjects of inquiry into Neuroscience. His Prefrontal cortex study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Stimulus, Transcranial magnetic stimulation, Resting state fMRI and Brain mapping.

The Cognitive psychology study combines topics in areas such as Developmental psychology, Blindsight, Visual perception, Functional magnetic resonance imaging and Visual cortex. The study incorporates disciplines such as Anterior cingulate cortex, Hippocampus and Social cognition in addition to Posterior parietal cortex. His study in Working memory is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Self-esteem, Orbital prefrontal cortex, Supplementary motor area, Motor cortex and Priming.

Between 2007 and 2019, his most popular works were:

  • Theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation to the prefrontal cortex impairs metacognitive visual awareness. (246 citations)
  • The Neurobiology of the Prefrontal Cortex: Anatomy, Evolution, and the Origin of Insight (193 citations)
  • Is Gray Matter Volume an Intermediate Phenotype for Schizophrenia? A Voxel-Based Morphometry Study of Patients with Schizophrenia and Their Healthy Siblings (177 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Neuroscience
  • Cognition
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging

His primary areas of study are Cognitive psychology, Neuroscience, Prefrontal cortex, Human brain and Cortex. He studies Posterior parietal cortex which is a part of Cognitive psychology. His research in Posterior parietal cortex focuses on subjects like Working memory, which are connected to Motor cortex and Supplementary motor area.

His studies deal with areas such as Stimulus, Transcranial magnetic stimulation, Stimulation and Neuroimaging as well as Prefrontal cortex. His Cortex study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Comparative anatomy, Middle frontal gyrus, Brain mapping and Set. His work in Social cognition addresses subjects such as Premotor cortex, which are connected to disciplines such as Cognition.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Motor sequence learning: a study with positron emission tomography

I. H. Jenkins;D. J. Brooks;P. D. Nixon;R. S. J. Frackowiak.
The Journal of Neuroscience (1994)

1422 Citations

Cortical areas and the selection of movement: a study with positron emission tomography.

M.-P. Deiber;R.E. Passingham;J.G. Colebatch;K.J. Friston.
Experimental Brain Research (1991)

1071 Citations

FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF THE MENTAL REPRESENTATION OF UPPER EXTREMITY MOVEMENTS IN HEALTHY SUBJECTS

K. M. Stephan;G. R. Fink;R. E. Passingham;D. Silbersweig.
Journal of Neurophysiology (1995)

1069 Citations

The anatomical basis of functional localization in the cortex

Richard E. Passingham;Richard E. Passingham;Klaas E. Stephan;Klaas E. Stephan;Rolf Kötter.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2002)

947 Citations

Reading hidden intentions in the human brain.

John-Dylan Haynes;Katsuyuki Sakai;Geraint Rees;Sam Gilbert.
Current Biology (2007)

791 Citations

Regional cerebral blood flow during voluntary arm and hand movements in human subjects.

J. G. Colebatch;M.-P. Deiber;R. E. Passingham;K. J. Friston.
Journal of Neurophysiology (1991)

755 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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