D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 33 Citations 5,597 107 World Ranking 4535 National Ranking 232

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Paleontology
  • Genus

Gregory E. Webb focuses on Geochemistry, Reef, Paleontology, Diagenesis and Trace element. His Geochemistry study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Seawater and Thrombolite. His Seawater research incorporates elements of Geologic time scale and Terrigenous sediment.

His Reef research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Calcimicrobe and Paleozoic. Specifically, his work in Paleontology is concerned with the study of Holocene. His Diagenesis study incorporates themes from Carbonate rock and Aragonite, Calcite.

His most cited work include:

  • Rare earth elements in Holocene reefal microbialites: a new shallow seawater proxy (439 citations)
  • Rare earth element geochemistry of Late Devonian reefal carbonates, Canning Basin, Western Australia : Confirmation of a seawater REE proxy in ancient limestones (385 citations)
  • The geochemistry of late Archaean microbial carbonate: Implications for ocean chemistry and continental erosion history (291 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His scientific interests lie mostly in Paleontology, Reef, Oceanography, Coral and Geochemistry. His study in Paleontology is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Ecology and Extinction event. His research integrates issues of Coral reef, Paleoecology, Holocene and Heron in his study of Reef.

Gregory E. Webb combines subjects such as Fauna and Terrigenous sediment with his study of Coral. His study looks at the relationship between Geochemistry and topics such as Seawater, which overlap with Intertidal zone. His work carried out in the field of Diagenesis brings together such families of science as Carbonate rock and Aragonite.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Paleontology (48.08%)
  • Reef (41.03%)
  • Oceanography (30.13%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Reef (41.03%)
  • Oceanography (30.13%)
  • Paleontology (48.08%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Reef, Oceanography, Paleontology, Coral reef and Holocene. His Reef study is associated with Ecology. Porites and Seawater are the primary areas of interest in his Oceanography study.

His Porites research integrates issues from Water quality, Surface runoff and Terrigenous sediment. Gregory E. Webb combines topics linked to Morphometrics with his work on Paleontology. His research in Holocene focuses on subjects like Sea level, which are connected to Upwelling and Fringing reef.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Modern carbonate ooids preserve ambient aqueous REE signatures (21 citations)
  • The evolution of the Great Barrier Reef during the Last Interglacial Period (18 citations)
  • Seasonal to decadal scale influence of environmental drivers on Ba/Ca and Y/Ca in coral aragonite from the southern Great Barrier Reef (10 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Paleontology
  • Genus

Gregory E. Webb spends much of his time researching Reef, Oceanography, Sea level, Holocene and Paleontology. His Reef study frequently draws connections to adjacent fields such as Environmental change. Gregory E. Webb interconnects Water quality and Terrigenous sediment in the investigation of issues within Oceanography.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Fringing reef, Pleistocene, Paleoclimatology and Upwelling. The Upwelling study combines topics in areas such as Coral reef, Radiocarbon dating, Marine isotope stage, Interglacial and Ice sheet. His research in Coral intersects with topics in Seawater, Sea surface temperature and Turbidity.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Rare earth elements in Holocene reefal microbialites: a new shallow seawater proxy

Gregory E. Webb;Balz S. Kamber.
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2000)

584 Citations

Rare earth element geochemistry of Late Devonian reefal carbonates, Canning Basin, Western Australia : Confirmation of a seawater REE proxy in ancient limestones

L. D. Nothdurft;G. E. Webb;B. S. Kamber.
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2004)

513 Citations

The geochemistry of late Archaean microbial carbonate: Implications for ocean chemistry and continental erosion history

Balz S Kamber;Gregory E Webb.
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2001)

376 Citations

Geological and trace element evidence for a marine sedimentary environment of deposition and biogenicity of 3.45 Ga stromatolitic carbonates in the Pilbara Craton, and support for a reducing Archaean ocean

Martin J. Van Kranendonk;Gregory E. Webb;Balz S. Kamber.
Geobiology (2003)

307 Citations

Has the REE composition of seawater changed over geological time

Graham A. Shields;Gregory E. Webb.
Chemical Geology (2004)

262 Citations

Was Phanerozoic reef history controlled by the distribution of non-enzymatically secreted reef carbonates (microbial carbonate and biologically induced cement)?

Gregory E. Webb.
Sedimentology (1996)

247 Citations

Rare earth element geochemistry of scleractinian coral skeleton during meteoric diagenesis: a sequence through neomorphism of aragonite to calcite

Gregory E. Webb;Luke D. Nothdurft;Balz S. Kamber;J. T. Kloprogge.
Sedimentology (2009)

173 Citations

Geochemistry of late Archaean stromatolites from Zimbabwe: evidence for microbial life in restricted epicontinental seas

Balz S Kamber;Robert Bolhar;Gregory E Webb.
Precambrian Research (2004)

157 Citations

Climate change frames debate over the extinction of megafauna in Sahul (Pleistocene Australia-New Guinea)

Stephen Wroe;Judith H. Field;Michael Archer;Donald K. Grayson.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

135 Citations

Cryptic intertidal microbialites in beachrock, Heron Island, Great Barrier Reef: implications for the origin of microcrystalline beachrock cement

Gregory E. Webb;John S. Jell;Julian C. Baker.
Sedimentary Geology (1999)

116 Citations

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