D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 68 Citations 12,791 326 World Ranking 487 National Ranking 43

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Archaeology

His primary areas of investigation include Oceanography, Geochemistry, Coral, Paleontology and Reef. All of his Oceanography and Monsoon, Holocene, Porites, Sea surface temperature and Sea level investigations are sub-components of the entire Oceanography study. His Monsoon research focuses on δ18O and how it relates to Speleothem.

His Geochemistry study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Granulite and Proterozoic. His Coral research incorporates themes from Coral reef and Climate change. His Paleontology research focuses on Cave and how it connects with Homo sapiens, Pleistocene, Homo erectus and Homo floresiensis.

His most cited work include:

  • Archaeology and age of a new hominin from Flores, in eastern Indonesia (344 citations)
  • Increasing Australian–Indonesian monsoon rainfall linked to early Holocene sea-level rise (234 citations)
  • Characterisation of a plume-related ∼ 800 Ma magmatic event and its implications for basin formation in central-southern Australia (215 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Oceanography, Geochemistry, Holocene, Coral and Reef are his primary areas of study. Oceanography is a component of his Coral reef, Sea level, Porites, Sea surface temperature and Monsoon studies. His Holocene study combines topics in areas such as δ18O, Radiocarbon dating and Upwelling.

His Coral research includes themes of Seawater and Global warming, Climate change. He has researched Paleontology in several fields, including Speleothem and Homo sapiens, Archaeology, China. In his research on the topic of Homo sapiens, Homo floresiensis is strongly related with Cave.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Oceanography (40.41%)
  • Geochemistry (29.12%)
  • Holocene (23.02%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Geochemistry (29.12%)
  • Oceanography (40.41%)
  • Reef (23.25%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Geochemistry, Oceanography, Reef, Coral and Coral reef are his primary areas of study. His study focuses on the intersection of Geochemistry and fields such as Structural basin with connections in the field of Zircon. As a member of one scientific family, he mostly works in the field of Oceanography, focusing on Terrigenous sediment and, on occasion, Atoll.

His work on Fringing reef as part of general Reef study is frequently connected to Refugium, therefore bridging the gap between diverse disciplines of science and establishing a new relationship between them. In his study, Climate change is inextricably linked to Sea surface temperature, which falls within the broad field of Coral. His work carried out in the field of Coral reef brings together such families of science as Paleontology, Environmental change and Bay.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Sector-zoned clinopyroxene as a recorder of magma history, eruption triggers, and ascent rates (40 citations)
  • Earliest hunting scene in prehistoric art (37 citations)
  • Last appearance of Homo erectus at Ngandong, Java, 117,000–108,000 years ago (30 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Paleontology
  • Archaeology

His scientific interests lie mostly in Geochemistry, Oceanography, Coral, Coral reef and Reef. His Geochemistry research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Structural basin and Quartz, Vein. His work on Terrigenous sediment expands to the thematically related Oceanography.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Global warming, Sea surface temperature, Oceanic climate and Paleoclimatology. The various areas that Jian-xin Zhao examines in his Coral reef study include Environmental change, δ18O, Suess effect, Isotope analysis and Magnetostratigraphy. He has included themes like East Asian Monsoon, Lithostratigraphy, Carbonate platform and Stratigraphy in his Reef study.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Archaeology and age of a new hominin from Flores, in eastern Indonesia

M J Morwood;R P Soejono;Richard G Roberts;T Sutikna.
Nature (2004)

590 Citations

Increasing Australian–Indonesian monsoon rainfall linked to early Holocene sea-level rise

Michael L Griffiths;Russell N Drysdale;Michael Gagan;Jian-xin Zhao.
Nature Geoscience (2009)

300 Citations

Characterisation of a plume-related ∼ 800 Ma magmatic event and its implications for basin formation in central-southern Australia

Jian-xin Zhao;Malcolm T. McCulloch;Russell J. Korsch.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters (1994)

270 Citations

U-Series dating of Liujiang hominid site in Guangxi, Southern China.

Guanjun Shen;Wei Wang;Qian Wang;Jianxin Zhao.
Journal of Human Evolution (2002)

204 Citations

Revised stratigraphy and chronology for Homo floresiensis at Liang Bua in Indonesia

Thomas Sutikna;Matthew W. Tocheri;Matthew W. Tocheri;Michael J. Morwood;E. Wahyu Saptomo.
Nature (2016)

194 Citations

Rare earth element geochemistry of scleractinian coral skeleton during meteoric diagenesis: a sequence through neomorphism of aragonite to calcite

Gregory E. Webb;Luke D. Nothdurft;Balz S. Kamber;J. T. Kloprogge.
Sedimentology (2009)

173 Citations

Geochemical and SmNd isotopic study of Neoproterozoic ophiolites from southeastern China: petrogenesis and tectonic implications

Xian-hua Li;Xian-hua Li;Jian-xin Zhao;Malcolm T. McCulloch;Guo-qing Zhou.
Precambrian Research (1997)

164 Citations

Thermal ionization mass spectrometry U-series dating of a hominid site near Nanjing, China

Jian-xin Zhao;Kai Hu;Kenneth D. Collerson;Han-kui Xu.
Geology (2001)

158 Citations

Stalagmite evidence for the onset of the Last Interglacial in southern Europe at 129±1 ka

Russell N. Drysdale;Giovanni Zanchetta;John C. Hellstrom;Anthony E. Fallick.
Geophysical Research Letters (2005)

153 Citations

Late Pleistocene to Holocene composite speleothem 18O and 13C chronologies from South Island, New Zealand—did a global Younger Dryas really exist?

P.W. Williams;D.N.T. King;J.-X. Zhao;K.D. Collerson.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2005)

152 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Jian-xin Zhao

Hai Cheng

Hai Cheng

Xi'an Jiaotong University

Publications: 165

Russell N. Drysdale

Russell N. Drysdale

University of Melbourne

Publications: 83

Chuan-Chou Shen

Chuan-Chou Shen

National Taiwan University

Publications: 79

John Hellstrom

John Hellstrom

University of Melbourne

Publications: 70

R. Lawrence Edwards

R. Lawrence Edwards

University of Minnesota

Publications: 65

M. Santosh

M. Santosh

China University of Geosciences

Publications: 64

Kefu Yu

Kefu Yu

Guangxi University

Publications: 63

Richard G. Roberts

Richard G. Roberts

University of Wollongong

Publications: 44

Giovanni Zanchetta

Giovanni Zanchetta

University of Pisa

Publications: 40

Michael D. Petraglia

Michael D. Petraglia

Max Planck Society

Publications: 39

Gangjian Wei

Gangjian Wei

Chinese Academy of Sciences

Publications: 37

Xian-Hua Li

Xian-Hua Li

Chinese Academy of Sciences

Publications: 36

Michael J. Morwood

Michael J. Morwood

University of Wollongong

Publications: 36

Yusuke Yokoyama

Yusuke Yokoyama

University of Tokyo

Publications: 35

Christoph Spötl

Christoph Spötl

University of Innsbruck

Publications: 34

Martin Hand

Martin Hand

University of Adelaide

Publications: 34

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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