H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Economics and Finance D-index 32 Citations 5,566 98 World Ranking 1844 National Ranking 53

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Macroeconomics
  • Productivity
  • Economy

Productivity, International trade, Growth accounting, Multifactor productivity and Investment are his primary areas of study. The Productivity study combines topics in areas such as Production, Economy and International economics. His International trade research includes elements of Capital and Demographic economics.

His Demographic economics research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Annual percentage rate and Total factor productivity growth. His research in Growth accounting intersects with topics in Structural change and Economic geography. His work is dedicated to discovering how Investment, Business cycle are connected with Labour economics and other disciplines.

His most cited work include:

  • The productivity gap between Europe and the United States : Trends and causes (446 citations)
  • EU Productivity and Competitiveness: An Industry Perspective Can Europe Resume the Catching-up Process? (250 citations)
  • ICT and productivity in Europe and the United States. Where do the differences come from (156 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Productivity, Labour economics, Economy, Investment and Manufacturing. His work on Total factor productivity as part of his general Productivity study is frequently connected to Unit, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science. His Total factor productivity research integrates issues from Demographic economics and International economics.

His Labour economics research incorporates elements of Multifactor productivity, Economic sector and Workforce. His Economy study often links to related topics such as Growth accounting. The concepts of his Investment study are interwoven with issues in Business cycle, International trade and Human capital.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Productivity (78.17%)
  • Labour economics (24.65%)
  • Economy (11.97%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2010-2021)?

  • Productivity (78.17%)
  • Recession (4.23%)
  • Total factor productivity (9.86%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Productivity, Recession, Total factor productivity, Growth accounting and Investment. The various areas that he examines in his Productivity study include Standard of living, Labour economics and International economics. His Recession study combines topics in areas such as Production and Development economics.

Bart van Ark has researched Development economics in several fields, including International trade, Macroeconomics and Total factor productivity growth. His Total factor productivity research incorporates themes from Engineering ethics and Engineering management. Bart van Ark integrates Investment with The Internet in his research.

Between 2010 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The Productivity Paradox of the New Digital Economy (31 citations)
  • Total factor productivity: Lessons from the past and directions for the future (10 citations)
  • Europe’s Productivity Performance in Comparative Perspective: Trends, Causes and Recent Developments (8 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Macroeconomics
  • Economy
  • Productivity

His primary scientific interests are in Productivity, Recession, Total factor productivity, Development economics and Financial crisis. His work on Productivity paradox as part of general Productivity study is frequently linked to Comparative perspective, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of science. His research integrates issues of Engineering ethics, Engineering management and International economics in his study of Total factor productivity.

His Development economics study incorporates themes from Supply and demand, International trade and Total factor productivity growth. His Financial crisis study frequently involves adjacent topics like Economic policy. His Capital research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Growth accounting and Econometrics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The productivity gap between Europe and the United States : Trends and causes

Bart van Ark;Mary O'Mahony;Marcel P. Timmer.
Journal of Economic Perspectives (2008)

882 Citations

EU Productivity and Competitiveness: An Industry Perspective Can Europe Resume the Catching-up Process?

Mary O'Mahony;Bart van Ark.
(2003)

466 Citations

EU KLEMS Growth and Productivity Accounts: An Overview

Marcel P. Timmer;Mary O’Mahony;Bart van Ark.
International Productivity Monitor (2007)

267 Citations

ICT and productivity in Europe and the United States. Where do the differences come from

Bart van Ark;Robert Inklaar;Robert H. McGuckin.
CESifo Economic Studies (2003)

234 Citations

Does information and communication technology drive EU-US productivity growth differentials?

Marcel P. Timmer;Bart van Ark.
Oxford economic papers-New series (2005)

223 Citations

Measuring intangible capital and its contribution to economic growth in Europe.

Bart van Ark;Janet X. Hao;Carol Corrado;Charles Hulten.
EIB papers = Cahiers BEI (2009)

213 Citations

IT in the European Union: Driving Productivity Divergence?

Marcel Timmer;Gerard Ypma;Bart van der Ark.
GGDC Research Memorandum (2003)

191 Citations

Productivity, innovation and ICT in old and new Europe

Bart van Ark;Marcin Piatkowski.
International Economics and Economic Policy (2004)

186 Citations

Sectoral growth accounting and structural change in postwar Europe

Bart van Ark.
Research Papers in Economics (1995)

155 Citations

Mind the gap! International comparisons of productivity in services and goods production

Robert Inklaar;Marcel P. Timmer;Bart van Ark.
German Economic Review (2007)

146 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Bart van Ark

Marcel P. Timmer

Marcel P. Timmer

University of Groningen

Publications: 43

Robert Inklaar

Robert Inklaar

University of Groningen

Publications: 27

Jonathan Haskel

Jonathan Haskel

Imperial College London

Publications: 23

Nicholas Crafts

Nicholas Crafts

University of Warwick

Publications: 18

Dale W. Jorgenson

Dale W. Jorgenson

Harvard University

Publications: 16

Stephen Broadberry

Stephen Broadberry

University of Oxford

Publications: 11

Bernard Hoekman

Bernard Hoekman

European University Institute

Publications: 10

John Van Reenen

John Van Reenen

MIT

Publications: 9

Robert J. Gordon

Robert J. Gordon

Northwestern University

Publications: 8

Susanto Basu

Susanto Basu

Boston College

Publications: 6

Reinhilde Veugelers

Reinhilde Veugelers

KU Leuven

Publications: 6

Rachel Griffith

Rachel Griffith

University of Manchester

Publications: 5

Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom

Stanford University

Publications: 5

Keld Laursen

Keld Laursen

Copenhagen Business School

Publications: 4

John G. Fernald

John G. Fernald

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

Publications: 4

Charles R. Hulten

Charles R. Hulten

University of Maryland, College Park

Publications: 4

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