H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 34 Citations 4,717 154 World Ranking 4396 National Ranking 2

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

Fellow of the Royal Society of South Africa

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Ecology
  • Neuroscience

His primary scientific interests are in Neuroscience, Anatomy, Brain size, African elephant and Cerebral cortex. His Neuroscience research integrates issues from Evolutionary biology and Phylogenetic tree. His Anatomy research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Retinal ganglion cell, Retina, Retinal ganglion, Cortex and Visual field.

His Brain size research incorporates elements of Dentate gyrus, Hippocampal formation and Neuropeptide. His studies deal with areas such as Motor system, Mammal and Imitation as well as African elephant. His Cerebral cortex research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Cerebellum, Pyramidal cell, Prefrontal cortex and Macaque.

His most cited work include:

  • The discovery of central monoamine neurons gave volume transmission to the wired brain. (194 citations)
  • Cetacean sleep: an unusual form of mammalian sleep. (183 citations)
  • Natural sleep and its seasonal variations in three pre-industrial societies. (167 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Neuroscience, Anatomy, Cerebral cortex, Zoology and Brain size. His research brings together the fields of Serotonergic and Neuroscience. He combines subjects such as Pyramidal cell, Retina, Neurogenesis, Visual field and African elephant with his study of Anatomy.

His Cerebral cortex research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Cortex and Neuron. Paul R. Manger interconnects Cerebellum, Brain Mass, Evolutionary biology and Allometry in the investigation of issues within Brain size. His Catecholaminergic study incorporates themes from Choline acetyltransferase, Rodent and Tyrosine hydroxylase.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (44.09%)
  • Anatomy (40.45%)
  • Cerebral cortex (15.91%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Neuroscience (44.09%)
  • Cerebral cortex (15.91%)
  • Evolutionary biology (11.82%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Neuroscience, Cerebral cortex, Evolutionary biology, Anatomy and Brain size. His work on Neuroscience is being expanded to include thematically relevant topics such as Manis tricuspis. His Cerebral cortex research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Soma, Immunocytochemistry and Enlarged cerebellum.

The Evolutionary biology study combines topics in areas such as Gyrification, Neuroanatomy, Banded mongoose, Domestication and Carnivore. His study on Lateral semicircular canal is often connected to Plains zebra as part of broader study in Anatomy. His Encephalization quotient study in the realm of Brain size connects with subjects such as Connectome, Information transmission and Gray.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • In search of common developmental and evolutionary origin of the claustrum and subplate. (10 citations)
  • White matter volume and white/gray matter ratio in mammalian species as a consequence of the universal scaling of cortical folding (8 citations)
  • Cortical interlaminar astrocytes across the therian mammal radiation (8 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Ecology
  • Neuroscience

Paul R. Manger mainly focuses on Cerebral cortex, Neuroscience, Brain size, Evolutionary biology and White matter. His Cerebral cortex study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Soma, Biological neural network, Evolution of mammals and Cell biology. His study in Sleep Stages, Unihemispheric slow-wave sleep, Sleep in non-human animals, Non-rapid eye movement sleep and Consciousness falls within the category of Neuroscience.

His Brain size study incorporates themes from Biological system and Cortical volume. The study incorporates disciplines such as Gyrification, Neuroanatomy, Stereology, Encephalization and Afrotheria in addition to Evolutionary biology. In Predation, he works on issues like Carnivora, which are connected to Cerebrospinal fluid, Mammal, Anatomy, Primate and Meninges.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The discovery of central monoamine neurons gave volume transmission to the wired brain.

Kjell Fuxe;Annica B. Dahlström;Gösta Jonsson;Daniel Marcellino.
Progress in Neurobiology (2010)

249 Citations

Natural sleep and its seasonal variations in three pre-industrial societies.

Gandhi Yetish;Hillard Kaplan;Michael Gurven;Brian Wood.
Current Biology (2015)

247 Citations

Cetacean sleep: an unusual form of mammalian sleep.

Oleg I. Lyamin;Paul R. Manger;Sam H. Ridgway;Lev M. Mukhametov.
Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews (2008)

240 Citations

An examination of cetacean brain structure with a novel hypothesis correlating thermogenesis to the evolution of a big brain

Paul R. Manger.
Biological Reviews (2006)

201 Citations

Specializations of the granular prefrontal cortex of primates: implications for cognitive processing.

Guy N. Elston;Guy N. Elston;Ruth Benavides‐Piccione;Alejandra Elston;Bendan Zietsch.
Anatomical Record-advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology (2006)

143 Citations

Mammalian Brains Are Made of These: A Dataset of the Numbers and Densities of Neuronal and Nonneuronal Cells in the Brain of Glires, Primates, Scandentia, Eulipotyphlans, Afrotherians and Artiodactyls, and Their Relationship with Body Mass.

Suzana Herculano-Houzel;Kenneth Catania;Paul R. Manger;Jon H. Kaas.
Brain Behavior and Evolution (2015)

133 Citations

In contrast to many other mammals, cetaceans have relatively small hippocampi that appear to lack adult neurogenesis

Nina Patzke;Muhammad A Spocter;Muhammad A Spocter;Karl Æ Karlsson;Mads F Bertelsen.
Brain Structure & Function (2015)

132 Citations

Brain scaling in mammalian evolution as a consequence of concerted and mosaic changes in numbers of neurons and average neuronal cell size.

Suzana Herculano-Houzel;Paul R. Manger;Jon H. Kaas.
Frontiers in Neuroanatomy (2014)

132 Citations

Order-specific quantitative patterns of cortical gyrification.

Praneshri Pillay;Paul R. Manger.
European Journal of Neuroscience (2007)

128 Citations

Architecture and Callosal Connections of Visual Areas 17, 18, 19 and 21 in the Ferret (Mustela putorius)

Giorgio M. Innocenti;Paul R. Manger;Italo Masiello;Isabelle Colin.
Cerebral Cortex (2002)

124 Citations

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