D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 58 Citations 22,612 116 World Ranking 6209 National Ranking 165

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Enzyme
  • DNA

Her primary areas of study are Cell biology, Inflammasome, Immunology, Pyrin domain and Signal transduction. The Cell biology study combines topics in areas such as Tumor necrosis factor alpha, Receptor and Cellular differentiation. Her Inflammasome study combines topics in areas such as Secretion, Reactive oxygen species and In vivo.

The various areas that she examines in her Immunology study include Fibrosis, Liver disease and Internal medicine. Kate Schroder works mostly in the field of Signal transduction, limiting it down to concerns involving Toll-like receptor and, occasionally, Transcriptional regulation, Effector, Priming, STAT1 and Interferon. Her Innate immune system research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Macrophage and Microbiology.

Her most cited work include:

  • Interferon-γ: an overview of signals, mechanisms and functions (2889 citations)
  • NLRP3 inflammasome activation: the convergence of multiple signalling pathways on ROS production? (1075 citations)
  • NLRP3 inflammasome activation: the convergence of multiple signalling pathways on ROS production? (1075 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Kate Schroder spends much of her time researching Cell biology, Inflammasome, Immunology, Innate immune system and Inflammation. Reactive oxygen species is closely connected to Secretion in her research, which is encompassed under the umbrella topic of Cell biology. Her work in Inflammasome addresses subjects such as Programmed cell death, which are connected to disciplines such as Signal transducing adaptor protein.

Her research integrates issues of Receptor and In vivo in her study of Immunology. Her study in Inflammation is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Cancer research and Pathogenesis. Her Signal transduction study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as NLRP3 inflammasome complex, Toll-like receptor and Transcription factor.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Cell biology (51.63%)
  • Inflammasome (49.67%)
  • Immunology (32.03%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Inflammasome (49.67%)
  • Cell biology (51.63%)
  • Inflammation (14.38%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Kate Schroder mainly focuses on Inflammasome, Cell biology, Inflammation, Immunology and Programmed cell death. Her work carried out in the field of Inflammasome brings together such families of science as Interleukin, Signal transduction and Immune system. Her studies deal with areas such as Secretion, Protease and NLRP3 inflammasome activation as well as Cell biology.

Kate Schroder interconnects Myocardial infarction, Pharmacology and Pathogenesis in the investigation of issues within Inflammation. In Immunology, she works on issues like Receptor, which are connected to Cell and In vivo. Her work is dedicated to discovering how Programmed cell death, Signal transducing adaptor protein are connected with Proinflammatory cytokine and other disciplines.

Between 2016 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • NLRP3 inflammasome blockade reduces liver inflammation and fibrosis in experimental NASH in mice. (298 citations)
  • Inflammasome inhibition prevents α-synuclein pathology and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice (183 citations)
  • MCC950 directly targets the NLRP3 ATP-hydrolysis motif for inflammasome inhibition (165 citations)

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Interferon-γ: an overview of signals, mechanisms and functions

Kate Schroder;Paul John Hertzog;Timothy Ravasi;David A Hume.
Journal of Leukocyte Biology (2004)

4420 Citations

NLRP3 inflammasome activation: the convergence of multiple signalling pathways on ROS production?

Jurg Tschopp;Kate Schroder;Kate Schroder.
Nature Reviews Immunology (2010)

1413 Citations

A small-molecule inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasome for the treatment of inflammatory diseases

Rebecca C Coll;Avril A B Robertson;Jae Jin Chae;Sarah C Higgins.
Nature Medicine (2015)

1046 Citations

The NLRP3 Inflammasome: A Sensor for Metabolic Danger?

Kate Schroder;Rongbin Zhou;Jurg Tschopp.
Science (2010)

960 Citations

The regulated retrotransposon transcriptome of mammalian cells.

Geoffrey J Faulkner;Yasumasa Kimura;Carsten O Daub;Shivangi Wani.
Nature Genetics (2009)

748 Citations

Osteal tissue macrophages are intercalated throughout human and mouse bone lining tissues and regulate osteoblast function in vitro and in vivo.

Ming K. Chang;Liza-Jane Raggatt;Kylie A. Alexander;Julia S. Kuliwaba.
Journal of Immunology (2008)

551 Citations

The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

Harukazu Suzuki;Alistair R.R. Forrest;Erik Van Nimwegen;Carsten O. Daub.
Nature Genetics (2009)

434 Citations

The macrophage-inducible C-type lectin, Mincle, is an essential component of the innate immune response to Candida albicans

Christine A Wells;Judith A Salvage-Jones;Xin Li;Kelly Hitchens.
Journal of Immunology (2008)

420 Citations

Expression analysis of G Protein-Coupled Receptors in mouse macrophages.

Jane E Lattin;Kate Schroder;Andrew I Su;John R Walker.
Immunome Research (2008)

406 Citations

Tiny RNAs associated with transcription start sites in animals.

Ryan J Taft;Evgeny A Glazov;Nicole Cloonan;Cas Simons.
Nature Genetics (2009)

404 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Kate Schroder

David A. Hume

David A. Hume

University of Queensland

Publications: 113

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Centre for Life

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Eicke Latz

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

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Alistair R. R. Forrest

Alistair R. R. Forrest

Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research

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James E. Vince

James E. Vince

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

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Matthew J. Sweet

Matthew J. Sweet

University of Queensland

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Hideya Kawaji

Hideya Kawaji

Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science

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Seth L. Masters

Seth L. Masters

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research

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Timo Lassmann

Timo Lassmann

Telethon Kids Institute

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Mihai G. Netea

Mihai G. Netea

Radboud University Nijmegen

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Carsten O. Daub

Carsten O. Daub

Karolinska Institute

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Harukazu Suzuki

Harukazu Suzuki

Centre for Life

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Mark E. Cooper

Mark E. Cooper

Monash University

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Gordon D. Brown

Gordon D. Brown

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