D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Computer Science D-index 31 Citations 7,657 100 World Ranking 7811 National Ranking 3683

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Linguistics
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Natural language processing

His scientific interests lie mostly in Artificial intelligence, Natural language processing, Linguistics, Speech recognition and Speech corpus. His research in the fields of Named entity overlaps with other disciplines such as Induction method. Mark Liberman combines subjects such as Annotation, Word, Information retrieval, Transcription and Applied linguistics with his study of Natural language processing.

His Linguistics research incorporates elements of Conversational speech and Parsing. His research in Speech recognition tackles topics such as Mixture model which are related to areas like Cepstrum, Mel-frequency cepstrum, Range and Voice activity detection. His Speech corpus study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Acoustic phonetics, Word recognition and Nonverbal communication.

His most cited work include:

  • Procedure for quantitatively comparing the syntactic coverage of English grammars (421 citations)
  • The intonational system of English (406 citations)
  • UNIPEN project of on-line data exchange and recognizer benchmarks (376 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Mark Liberman focuses on Speech recognition, Linguistics, Artificial intelligence, Natural language processing and Mandarin Chinese. While the research belongs to areas of Speech recognition, he spends his time largely on the problem of Stress, intersecting his research to questions surrounding Intonation. His work in Linguistics covers topics such as Annotation which are related to areas like Coreference.

His research in Artificial intelligence intersects with topics in Context, Software and Pattern recognition. His Natural language processing research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Speech corpus, Information retrieval and Phonetic transcription. His research investigates the connection between Speaker diarisation and topics such as Robustness that intersect with issues in Voice activity detection.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Speech recognition (33.52%)
  • Linguistics (28.02%)
  • Artificial intelligence (26.92%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2016-2021)?

  • Speech recognition (33.52%)
  • Audiology (6.04%)
  • Linguistics (28.02%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Mark Liberman mostly deals with Speech recognition, Audiology, Linguistics, Speaker diarisation and Prosody. Mark Liberman has included themes like Pronunciation, Segmentation and Word in his Speech recognition study. The various areas that Mark Liberman examines in his Audiology study include Progressive supranuclear palsy, Atrophy and Cognitive impairment.

His study in American English and On Language falls under the purview of Linguistics. His Speaker diarisation research focuses on Robustness and how it connects with Speech segmentation. His Prosody research includes elements of Speech perception, Perception, Speech processing, Mode and Phonation.

Between 2016 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The Second DIHARD Diarization Challenge: Dataset, Task, and Baselines. (53 citations)
  • Linguistic camouflage in girls with autism spectrum disorder. (53 citations)
  • Automatic measurement of prosody in behavioral variant FTD (22 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Linguistics
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Speech recognition

His primary areas of study are Speech recognition, Speaker diarisation, Robustness, Prosody and Speech segmentation. His study ties his expertise on Segmentation together with the subject of Speech recognition. He interconnects Duration, Selection, Standard Chinese, Agreement and Phone in the investigation of issues within Segmentation.

Mark Liberman conducts interdisciplinary study in the fields of Speaker diarisation and Speech enhancement through his research. His study looks at the relationship between Prosody and topics such as Audiology, which overlap with Atrophy. His Utterance study combines topics in areas such as Mode, Speech processing, Perception and TIMIT.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The intonational system of English

Mark Yoffe Liberman.
(1979)

1491 Citations

Procedure for quantitatively comparing the syntactic coverage of English grammars

S. Abney;S. Flickenger;C. Gdaniec;C. Grishman.
human language technology (1991)

639 Citations

Speaker identification on the SCOTUS corpus

Jiahong Yuan;Mark Liberman.
Journal of the Acoustical Society of America (2008)

625 Citations

A formal framework for linguistic annotation

Steven Bird;Mark Liberman.
Speech Communication (2001)

611 Citations

UNIPEN project of on-line data exchange and recognizer benchmarks

I. Guyon;L. Schomaker;R. Plamondon;M. Liberman.
international conference on pattern recognition (1994)

568 Citations

Transcriber: Development and use of a tool for assisting speech corpora production

Claude Barras;Edouard Geoffrois;Zhibiao Wu;Mark Liberman.
Speech Communication (2001)

473 Citations

Integrated Annotation for Biomedical Information Extraction

Seth Kulick;Ann Bies;Mark Liberman;Mark Mandel.
north american chapter of the association for computational linguistics (2004)

229 Citations

Towards an Integrated Understanding of Speaking Rate in Conversation

Jiahong Yuan;Mark Liberman;Christopher Cieri.
conference of the international speech communication association (2006)

228 Citations

The Stress and Structure of Modified Noun Phrases in English

Mark Liberman;Richard Sproat.
(1992)

226 Citations

Text Analysis and Word Pronunciation in Text-to-speech Synthesis

Mark Y. Liberman;Kenneth W. Church.
(2013)

173 Citations

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