H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 66 Citations 15,561 279 World Ranking 561 National Ranking 9

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2010 - Fellow of American Geophysical Union (AGU)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Seismology
  • Oceanography
  • Subduction

His main research concerns Seismology, Tsunami earthquake, Subduction, Seismic moment and Bathymetry. The concepts of his Seismology study are interwoven with issues in Tide gauge, Geodetic datum and Far East. His work deals with themes such as Intraplate earthquake, Interplate earthquake, Geodesy, Focal mechanism and Seismic gap, which intersect with Tsunami earthquake.

His Subduction research includes elements of Tsunami hazard, Subsidence, Plate tectonics, Fault and Moment magnitude scale. His research integrates issues of Epicenter and Seafloor spreading in his study of Seismic moment. His Bathymetry study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Submarine landslide, Pacific ocean, Computation and Seabed.

His most cited work include:

  • The great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004 (830 citations)
  • Tsunami source of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake (386 citations)
  • Time and size of a giant earthquake in Cascadia inferred from Japanese tsunami records of January 1700 (342 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Seismology, Tsunami earthquake, Subduction, Tide gauge and Oceanography. His studies link Geodesy with Seismology. His Geodesy research includes themes of Inversion and Focal mechanism.

His Tsunami earthquake research incorporates elements of Submarine pipeline, Seafloor spreading, Bathymetry, Seismic gap and Moment magnitude scale. His research on Subduction often connects related topics like Plate tectonics. His Seismic moment research integrates issues from Epicenter and Interplate earthquake.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Seismology (73.91%)
  • Tsunami earthquake (25.60%)
  • Subduction (14.01%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Seismology (73.91%)
  • Volcano (7.49%)
  • Data assimilation (3.86%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Seismology, Volcano, Data assimilation, Tsunami earthquake and Oceanography. Many of his research projects under Seismology are closely connected to Near and far field and Term with Near and far field and Term, tying the diverse disciplines of science together. His multidisciplinary approach integrates Near and far field and Geodetic datum in his work.

His Caldera and Submarine volcano study in the realm of Volcano interacts with subjects such as Mechanism and Flank. His work carried out in the field of Data assimilation brings together such families of science as Ocean bottom and Sound. His research on Tsunami earthquake frequently links to adjacent areas such as Bathymetry.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Source Estimate for the 1960 Chile Earthquake From Joint Inversion of Geodetic and Transoceanic Tsunami Data (13 citations)
  • The 22 December 2018 tsunami from flank collapse of Anak Krakatau volcano during eruption. (12 citations)
  • Ray Tracing for Dispersive Tsunamis and Source Amplitude Estimation Based on Green’s Law: Application to the 2015 Volcanic Tsunami Earthquake Near Torishima, South of Japan (12 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Seismology
  • Oceanography
  • Statistics

Kenji Satake mainly investigates Seismology, Data assimilation, Tsunami earthquake, Volcano and Submarine pipeline. His work on Seismology is being expanded to include thematically relevant topics such as Tide gauge. As a part of the same scientific family, Kenji Satake mostly works in the field of Tide gauge, focusing on Richter magnitude scale and, on occasion, Subduction.

His research in Tsunami earthquake intersects with topics in Magnetic dip, Bathymetry, Plate tectonics and Décollement. His research investigates the connection between Volcano and topics such as Seismic wave that intersect with issues in Landslide, Ground shaking and Submarine volcano. His research in Submarine pipeline tackles topics such as Epicenter which are related to areas like Seafloor spreading.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

The great Sumatra-Andaman earthquake of 26 December 2004

Thorne Lay;Thorne Lay;Hiroo Kanamori;Charles J. Ammon;Meredith Nettles.
Science (2005)

1230 Citations

Time and size of a giant earthquake in Cascadia inferred from Japanese tsunami records of January 1700

K. Satake;K. Shimazaki;Y. Tsuji;K. Ueda.
Nature (1996)

568 Citations

Tsunami source of the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake

Yushiro Fujii;Kenji Satake;Shin’ichi Sakai;Masanao Shinohara.
Earth, Planets and Space (2011)

540 Citations

Unusually large earthquakes inferred from tsunami deposits along the Kuril trench

Futoshi Nanayama;Kenji Satake;Ryuta Furukawa;Koichi Shimokawa.
Nature (2003)

483 Citations

Tsunami generation by horizontal displacement of ocean bottom

Yuichiro Tanioka;Kenji Satake.
Geophysical Research Letters (1996)

433 Citations

Time and Space Distribution of Coseismic Slip of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake as Inferred from Tsunami Waveform Data

Kenji Satake;Yushiro Fujii;Tomoya Harada;Yuichi Namegaya.
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2013)

431 Citations

The Orphan Tsunami of 1700: Japanese Clues to a Parent Earthquake in North America

Brian F. Atwater;Satoko Musumi-Rokkaku;Kenji Satake;Yoshinobu Tsuji.
Professional Paper (2005)

410 Citations

Fault slip and seismic moment of the 1700 Cascadia earthquake inferred from Japanese tsunami descriptions

Kenji Satake;Kelin Wang;Brian F. Atwater.
Journal of Geophysical Research (2003)

327 Citations

Sedimentary differences between the 1993 Hokkaido-nansei-oki tsunami and the 1959 Miyakojima typhoon at Taisei, southwestern Hokkaido, northern Japan

F Nanayama;K Shigeno;K Satake;K Shimokawa.
Sedimentary Geology (2000)

315 Citations

Tsunami Source of the 2004 Sumatra–Andaman Earthquake Inferred from Tide Gauge and Satellite Data

Yushiro Fujii;Kenji Satake.
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2007)

269 Citations

If you think any of the details on this page are incorrect, let us know.

Contact us

Best Scientists Citing Kenji Satake

Fumihiko Imamura

Fumihiko Imamura

Tohoku University

Publications: 85

Costas E. Synolakis

Costas E. Synolakis

University of Southern California

Publications: 74

Emile A. Okal

Emile A. Okal

Northwestern University

Publications: 66

Thorne Lay

Thorne Lay

University of California, Santa Cruz

Publications: 66

Shuichi Kodaira

Shuichi Kodaira

Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

Publications: 65

James Goff

James Goff

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 63

Kelin Wang

Kelin Wang

Geological Survey of Canada

Publications: 60

Kazuhisa Goto

Kazuhisa Goto

University of Tokyo

Publications: 57

Yoshiyuki Kaneda

Yoshiyuki Kaneda

Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

Publications: 55

Ryota Hino

Ryota Hino

Tohoku University

Publications: 51

Catherine Chagué-Goff

Catherine Chagué-Goff

UNSW Sydney

Publications: 50

Vasily V. Titov

Vasily V. Titov

Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Publications: 47

Alexander B. Rabinovich

Alexander B. Rabinovich

Institute of Oceanology. PP Shirshov Russian Academy of Sciences

Publications: 45

Benjamin P. Horton

Benjamin P. Horton

Nanyang Technological University

Publications: 45

Hiroo Kanamori

Hiroo Kanamori

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 43

Eric L. Geist

Eric L. Geist

United States Geological Survey

Publications: 41

Something went wrong. Please try again later.