H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 100 Citations 29,584 339 World Ranking 260 National Ranking 5

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Neuroscience
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Internal medicine

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Neuroscience, Visual cortex, Brain mapping, Macaque and Functional magnetic resonance imaging. Visual system, Parietal lobe, Stimulus, Intraparietal sulcus and Cortex are among the areas of Neuroscience where he concentrates his study. His Visual cortex research incorporates themes from Receptive field, Artificial intelligence, Electrophysiology, Sensory system and Computer vision.

The various areas that Guy Orban examines in his Brain mapping study include Communication, Anatomy, Motion perception, Occipital lobe and Temporal lobe. Guy Orban has researched Macaque in several fields, including Binocular neurons, Extrastriate cortex, Neuroimaging and Primate. His Functional magnetic resonance imaging research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Biological motion, Motion, Nerve net and Posterior parietal cortex.

His most cited work include:

  • Practising orientation identification improves orientation coding in V1 neurons (668 citations)
  • Comparative mapping of higher visual areas in monkeys and humans (498 citations)
  • Visual motion processing investigated using contrast agent-enhanced fMRI in awake behaving monkeys (395 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Guy Orban spends much of his time researching Neuroscience, Visual cortex, Artificial intelligence, Macaque and Stimulus. His Brain mapping, Posterior parietal cortex, Receptive field, Functional magnetic resonance imaging and Visual perception study are his primary interests in Neuroscience. He focuses mostly in the field of Brain mapping, narrowing it down to topics relating to Temporal lobe and, in certain cases, Temporal cortex.

His Visual cortex study combines topics in areas such as Motion perception, Electrophysiology, Sensory system and Anatomy. His research integrates issues of Computer vision and Pattern recognition in his study of Artificial intelligence. As a part of the same scientific family, Guy Orban mostly works in the field of Macaque, focusing on Communication and, on occasion, Form perception.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (53.04%)
  • Visual cortex (22.32%)
  • Artificial intelligence (17.50%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Neuroscience (53.04%)
  • Posterior parietal cortex (10.89%)
  • Premotor cortex (5.18%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Guy Orban focuses on Neuroscience, Posterior parietal cortex, Premotor cortex, Functional imaging and Brain mapping. His research in the fields of Macaque, Human brain, Stimulus and Functional magnetic resonance imaging overlaps with other disciplines such as Action observation. Guy Orban interconnects Parietal lobe, Sulcus and Sensory system in the investigation of issues within Posterior parietal cortex.

He combines subjects such as Mirror neuron, Motion perception, Communication and Depth perception with his study of Premotor cortex. His Brain mapping study incorporates themes from Cerebral cortex and Retinotopy, Visual cortex. Guy Orban specializes in Visual cortex, namely Visual system.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Evolutionarily Novel Functional Networks in the Human Brain (184 citations)
  • Evolutionarily Novel Functional Networks in the Human Brain (184 citations)
  • The neural basis of human tool use. (139 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Neuroscience
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Internal medicine

Guy Orban mainly focuses on Neuroscience, Human brain, Brain mapping, Artificial intelligence and Posterior parietal cortex. Guy Orban performs integrative study on Neuroscience and Action observation in his works. His Human brain research incorporates elements of Cerebral cortex, Frontal lobe and Nerve net.

His work in Brain mapping covers topics such as Visual cortex which are related to areas like Motion perception. His work carried out in the field of Artificial intelligence brings together such families of science as Human equivalent and Computer vision. His Posterior parietal cortex research includes elements of Parietal lobe, Premotor cortex and Superior parietal lobule.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Practising orientation identification improves orientation coding in V1 neurons

Aniek Schoups;Rufin Vogels;Ning Qian;Guy Orban.
Nature (2001)

852 Citations

Comparative mapping of higher visual areas in monkeys and humans

Guy A. Orban;David Van Essen;Wim Vanduffel;Wim Vanduffel.
Trends in Cognitive Sciences (2004)

657 Citations

Neuronal Operations in the Visual Cortex

Guy A. Orban.
(1983)

571 Citations

Parietal Representation of Symbolic and Nonsymbolic Magnitude

Wim Fias;Jan Lammertyn;Bert Reynvoet;Patrick Dupont.
Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2003)

541 Citations

Visual motion processing investigated using contrast agent-enhanced fMRI in awake behaving monkeys

Wim Vanduffel;Denis Fize;Joseph B Mandeville;Koen Nelissen.
Neuron (2001)

475 Citations

Observing Others: Multiple Action Representation in the Frontal Lobe

Koen Nelissen;Giuseppe Luppino;Wim Vanduffel;Wim Vanduffel;Giacomo Rizzolatti.
Science (2005)

408 Citations

Human perceptual learning in identifying the oblique orientation: retinotopy, orientation specificity and monocularity.

A A Schoups;Rufin Vogels;Guy Orban.
The Journal of Physiology (1995)

403 Citations

Motion-responsive regions of the human brain.

Stefan Sunaert;Paul Van Hecke;Guy Marchal;Guy Orban.
Experimental Brain Research (1999)

399 Citations

Extracting 3D from Motion: Differences in Human and Monkey Intraparietal Cortex

Wim Vanduffel;Denis Fize;H Peuskens;Katrien Denys.
Science (2002)

374 Citations

Cue-invariant shape selectivity of macaque inferior temporal neurons

Gyula Sáry;Rufin Vogels;Guy A. Orban.
Science (1993)

364 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Guy A. Orban

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