D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 65 Citations 17,030 161 World Ranking 572 National Ranking 286

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2020 - Arthur L. Day Medal, The Geological Society of America

2015 - Geochemistry Fellow Honor, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry

2002 - Young Scientist Award (Donath Medal), The Geological Society of America

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Paleontology
  • Ecology
  • Law

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Isotope fractionation, Anoxic waters, Earth science, Fractionation and Paleontology. His Isotope fractionation research incorporates elements of Inorganic chemistry, Trace element, Schreibersite, Mineralogy and Earth. Ariel D. Anbar works mostly in the field of Anoxic waters, limiting it down to topics relating to Extinction and, in certain cases, Siliciclastic.

Ariel D. Anbar combines subjects such as Earth, Ocean chemistry and Boring Billion, Proterozoic with his study of Earth science. His Fractionation research includes elements of Seawater, Environmental chemistry and Analytical chemistry. In his research, Authigenic is intimately related to Deep sea, which falls under the overarching field of Paleontology.

His most cited work include:

  • Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: A bioinorganic bridge? (801 citations)
  • Tracing the stepwise oxygenation of the Proterozoic ocean (684 citations)
  • A Whiff of Oxygen Before the Great Oxidation Event (661 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Geochemistry, Environmental chemistry, Astrobiology, Isotope fractionation and Anoxic waters. Ariel D. Anbar works mostly in the field of Geochemistry, limiting it down to topics relating to Seawater and, in certain cases, Water column, as a part of the same area of interest. His Astrobiology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Exoplanet and Planet.

He interconnects Inorganic chemistry and Adsorption in the investigation of issues within Isotope fractionation. His Anoxic waters study is focused on Oceanography in general. Great Oxygenation Event and Precambrian are frequently intertwined in his study.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Geochemistry (19.83%)
  • Environmental chemistry (14.87%)
  • Astrobiology (14.01%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Geochemistry (19.83%)
  • Astrobiology (14.01%)
  • Great Oxygenation Event (6.68%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Ariel D. Anbar spends much of his time researching Geochemistry, Astrobiology, Great Oxygenation Event, Exoplanet and Archean. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Seawater, Oil shale and Isotope fractionation. Ariel D. Anbar has researched Seawater in several fields, including Bottom water, Hydrothermal circulation, Pelagic zone and Diagenesis.

In his work, Geologic record, Total organic carbon, Early Triassic and Water column is strongly intertwined with Anoxic waters, which is a subfield of Oil shale. His Isotope fractionation study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Environmental chemistry and Silicate. His Great Oxygenation Event research includes themes of Continental shelf and Mantle.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Secular mantle oxidation across the Archean-Proterozoic boundary: Evidence from V partitioning in komatiites and picrites (36 citations)
  • Fully oxygenated water columns over continental shelves before the Great Oxidation Event (33 citations)
  • Global marine redox changes drove the rise and fall of the Ediacara biota. (27 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Law
  • Paleontology

Ariel D. Anbar mostly deals with Geochemistry, Anoxic waters, Seafloor spreading, Mantle and Isotope fractionation. His work is connected to Sedimentary rock and Great Oxygenation Event, as a part of Geochemistry. His Anoxic waters study combines topics in areas such as Oil shale and Water column.

His Seafloor spreading research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Volcano, Geologic record, Carbon cycle, Seawater and Extinction event. Isotope fractionation is a primary field of his research addressed under Fractionation. His work carried out in the field of Fractionation brings together such families of science as Environmental chemistry, Thiol and Silicic.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Proterozoic ocean chemistry and evolution: A bioinorganic bridge?

Ariel D. Anbar;Andrew Knoll.
Science (2002)

1082 Citations

A Whiff of Oxygen Before the Great Oxidation Event

Ariel D. Anbar;Yun Duan;Timothy W. Lyons;Gail L. Arnold.
Science (2007)

1043 Citations

Tracing the stepwise oxygenation of the Proterozoic ocean

C. Scott;T. W. Lyons;A. Bekker;A. Bekker;Y. Shen.
Nature (2008)

835 Citations

A Bacterium That Can Grow by Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus

Felisa Wolfe-Simon;Felisa Wolfe-Simon;Jodi Switzer Blum;Thomas R. Kulp;Gwyneth W. Gordon.
Science (2011)

611 Citations

Molybdenum isotope evidence for widespread anoxia in mid-Proterozoic oceans.

G. L. Arnold;A. D. Anbar;J. Barling;T. W. Lyons.
Science (2004)

597 Citations

Natural mass-dependent variations in the isotopic composition of molybdenum

J Barling;G.L Arnold;A.D Anbar.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters (2001)

403 Citations

Natural fractionation of 238U/235U

S. Weyer;Ariel Anbar;A. Gerdes;Gwyneth Gordon.
Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta (2008)

385 Citations

Late Archean Biospheric Oxygenation and Atmospheric Evolution

Alan J. Kaufman;David T. Johnston;James Farquhar;Andrew L. Masterson.
Science (2007)

370 Citations

A photochemical model of the martian atmosphere

Hari Nair;Mark Allen;Ariel D. Anbar;Yuk L. Yung.
Icarus (1994)

366 Citations

Ocean oxygenation in the wake of the Marinoan glaciation

Swapan K. Sahoo;Noah J. Planavsky;Brian Kendall;Brian Kendall;Xinqiang Wang.
Nature (2012)

353 Citations

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Thomas J. Algeo

Thomas J. Algeo

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Timothy W. Lyons

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French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea

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Simon W. Poulton

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Clark M. Johnson

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University of Wisconsin–Madison

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Brian L. Beard

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Andrew H. Knoll

Harvard University

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University of Tübingen

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University of Chicago

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