H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience H-index 113 Citations 61,175 375 World Ranking 171 National Ranking 5

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Internal medicine

His main research concerns Neuroscience, Frontal lobe, Cognition, Working memory and Spatial memory. Neuroscience is represented through his Prefrontal cortex, Functional neuroimaging, Caudate nucleus, Functional magnetic resonance imaging and Basal ganglia research. His research integrates issues of Audiology, Cognitive flexibility, Parkinson's disease, Neuropsychological test and Hippocampus in his study of Frontal lobe.

His Cognition research integrates issues from Speech perception, Human brain and Set. His Working memory research incorporates elements of Parietal lobe, Cognitive psychology, Verbal memory and Planning. Adrian M. Owen has included themes like Executive functions, Tower of London test, Long-term memory and Visual memory in his Spatial memory study.

His most cited work include:

  • N‐back working memory paradigm: A meta‐analysis of normative functional neuroimaging studies (2278 citations)
  • Common regions of the human frontal lobe recruited by diverse cognitive demands. (2031 citations)
  • Detecting Awareness in the Vegetative State (1184 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Adrian M. Owen mainly focuses on Neuroscience, Cognition, Cognitive psychology, Working memory and Functional magnetic resonance imaging. His research on Neuroscience frequently connects to adjacent areas such as Parkinson's disease. In his study, Physical medicine and rehabilitation is inextricably linked to Minimally conscious state, which falls within the broad field of Cognition.

His Cognitive psychology research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Perception, Stimulus, Consciousness, Anterior cingulate cortex and Semantic memory. His study looks at the intersection of Working memory and topics like Posterior parietal cortex with Parietal lobe. His Functional magnetic resonance imaging research incorporates themes from Neural correlates of consciousness, Functional imaging and Electroencephalography.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (43.80%)
  • Cognition (44.01%)
  • Cognitive psychology (36.78%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Cognition (44.01%)
  • Consciousness (17.15%)
  • Neuroscience (43.80%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Cognition, Consciousness, Neuroscience, Cognitive psychology and Electroencephalography. His Cognition study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Neuroimaging and Anxiety. His work on Disorders of consciousness as part of his general Consciousness study is frequently connected to Covert, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science.

His Cognitive psychology research focuses on subjects like Rhythm, which are linked to Auditory imagery. His Electroencephalography course of study focuses on Audiology and Vigilance and Sleep restriction. His Functional magnetic resonance imaging research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Motor imagery and Brain–computer interface.

Between 2018 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Human consciousness is supported by dynamic complex patterns of brain signal coordination (121 citations)
  • Consciousness-specific dynamic interactions of brain integration and functional diversity. (44 citations)
  • Opportunities and challenges for a maturing science of consciousness (22 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Cognition
  • Neuroscience
  • Artificial intelligence

Adrian M. Owen mostly deals with Cognition, Consciousness, Neuroscience, Electroencephalography and Functional magnetic resonance imaging. His study in the field of Cognitive test is also linked to topics like Context. His work carried out in the field of Consciousness brings together such families of science as Psycholinguistics, Neuroimaging, Default mode network and Ising model.

Adrian M. Owen combines subjects such as Tractography and Unconsciousness with his study of Neuroscience. Adrian M. Owen interconnects Cognitive psychology, Construct, Propofol and Sedation in the investigation of issues within Electroencephalography. The various areas that Adrian M. Owen examines in his Functional magnetic resonance imaging study include Dopaminergic, Ventral striatum, Dorsum and Disease.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

N‐back working memory paradigm: A meta‐analysis of normative functional neuroimaging studies

Adrian M. Owen;Kathryn M. McMillan;Angela R. Laird;Ed Bullmore.
Human Brain Mapping (2005)

3150 Citations

Common regions of the human frontal lobe recruited by diverse cognitive demands.

John Duncan;Adrian M Owen.
Trends in Neurosciences (2000)

2840 Citations

Detecting Awareness in the Vegetative State

Adrian M. Owen;Martin R. Coleman;Melanie Boly;Matthew H. Davis.
Science (2006)

1736 Citations

Planning and spatial working memory following frontal lobe lesions in man.

Adrian M. Owen;John J. Downes;Barbara J. Sahakian;Charles E. Polkey.
Neuropsychologia (1990)

1512 Citations

Willful Modulation of Brain Activity in Disorders of Consciousness

Martin M. Monti;Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse;Martin R. Coleman;Melanie Boly.
The New England Journal of Medicine (2010)

1400 Citations

The problem of functional localization in the human brain

Matthew Brett;Ingrid S. Johnsrude;Adrian M. Owen.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2002)

1369 Citations

Putting brain training to the test

Adrian M. Owen;Adam Hampshire;Jessica A. Grahn;Robert Stenton.
Nature (2010)

1295 Citations

Anterior prefrontal cortex: insights into function from anatomy and neuroimaging.

Narender Ramnani;Adrian M. Owen.
Nature Reviews Neuroscience (2004)

1287 Citations

Brain function in coma, vegetative state, and related disorders

Steven Laureys;Adrian M Owen;Nicholas D Schiff.
Lancet Neurology (2004)

1161 Citations

Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB): a factor analytic study of a large sample of normal elderly volunteers.

T.W. Robbins;M. James;A.M. Owen;B.J. Sahakian.
Dementia (1994)

1076 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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Top Scientists Citing Adrian M. Owen

Steven Laureys

Steven Laureys

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