D-Index & Metrics Best Publications
Research.com 2023 Best Female Scientist Award Badge

D-Index & Metrics D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines.

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Medicine D-index 120 Citations 48,219 435 World Ranking 2121 National Ranking 1229
Genetics D-index 122 Citations 48,677 428 World Ranking 198 National Ranking 108
Best female scientists D-index 122 Citations 48,749 439 World Ranking 304 National Ranking 192

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2023 - Research.com Best Female Scientist Award

2022 - Research.com Best Female Scientist Award

2009 - Gruber Prize in Genetics

1998 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

1998 - US President's National Medal of Science "For revolutionizing cancer research, diagnosis, and treatment through her discovery of chromosomal translocations in cancer and her pioneering work on the relationship of prior treatment to recurring chromosome abnormalities, for epitomizing the bench to bedside philosophy in her application of basic discoveries to clinical medicine, and for her leadership nationally and internationally in the oncology and biomedical communities.", Presented by President William Jefferson Clinton at a White House (East Room) ceremony on Tuesday, April 27, 1999.

1991 - William Allan Award, the American Society of Human Genetics

1984 - Member of the National Academy of Sciences

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Gene
  • DNA
  • Cancer

Janet D. Rowley mainly focuses on Leukemia, Molecular biology, Chromosomal translocation, Genetics and Myeloid leukemia. Her Leukemia study combines topics in areas such as Myeloid, Cancer research, Bone marrow and Chromosome abnormality. Janet D. Rowley works mostly in the field of Molecular biology, limiting it down to concerns involving Tyrosine kinase and, occasionally, Kinase.

Janet D. Rowley interconnects Gene rearrangement, Chromosome 3, Chromosome, Karyotype and Chronic myelogenous leukemia in the investigation of issues within Chromosomal translocation. Her Karyotype research incorporates elements of Fluorescence in situ hybridization, Cytogenetics and Pathology. In Myeloid leukemia, Janet D. Rowley works on issues like RUNX1T1, which are connected to RUNX1.

Her most cited work include:

  • Letter: A new consistent chromosomal abnormality in chronic myelogenous leukaemia identified by quinacrine fluorescence and Giemsa staining. (3566 citations)
  • Fusion of the TEL gene on 12p13 to the AML1 gene on 21q22 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (654 citations)
  • 15/17 TRANSLOCATION, A CONSISTENT CHROMOSOMAL CHANGE IN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKAEMIA (556 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Janet D. Rowley mostly deals with Leukemia, Chromosomal translocation, Genetics, Molecular biology and Chromosome. Her Leukemia study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Myeloid, Cancer research and Myeloid leukemia. Her Cancer research research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Cancer and microRNA.

Her Chromosomal translocation research includes elements of Chronic myelogenous leukemia, Gene rearrangement, Karyotype and Cytogenetics. The study incorporates disciplines such as Clone and Pathology, Internal medicine, Lymphoma in addition to Karyotype. As a member of one scientific family, Janet D. Rowley mostly works in the field of Molecular biology, focusing on Fluorescence in situ hybridization and, on occasion, ETV6.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Leukemia (44.74%)
  • Chromosomal translocation (41.45%)
  • Genetics (35.09%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2002-2016)?

  • Leukemia (44.74%)
  • Genetics (35.09%)
  • Myeloid leukemia (19.96%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Her primary scientific interests are in Leukemia, Genetics, Myeloid leukemia, Molecular biology and Cancer research. Janet D. Rowley works mostly in the field of Leukemia, limiting it down to topics relating to Gene rearrangement and, in certain cases, Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein, as a part of the same area of interest. Her study in Gene, Chromosomal translocation, Breakpoint, Karyotype and Regulation of gene expression is carried out as part of her Genetics studies.

Karyotype is a primary field of her research addressed under Chromosome. Her work in Molecular biology addresses subjects such as X chromosome, which are connected to disciplines such as Chromosome 18. Her research in Cancer research intersects with topics in Haematopoiesis, Stem cell, Immunology, Ectopic expression and microRNA.

Between 2002 and 2016, her most popular works were:

  • Clinical-cytogenetic associations in 306 patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia and myeloid leukemia: the University of Chicago series. (543 citations)
  • MicroRNA expression signatures accurately discriminate acute lymphoblastic leukemia from acute myeloid leukemia (430 citations)
  • Distinct microRNA expression profiles in acute myeloid leukemia with common translocations (391 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Cancer
  • DNA

Janet D. Rowley focuses on Cancer research, Myeloid leukemia, Leukemia, Molecular biology and Genetics. The study incorporates disciplines such as Haematopoiesis, Cellular differentiation, Hox gene, microRNA and Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein in addition to Cancer research. Her Myeloid leukemia study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Myeloid, ABL, RUNX1T1 and Acute leukemia.

Her Leukemia study is concerned with the field of Internal medicine as a whole. The various areas that she examines in her Molecular biology study include Embryonic stem cell and Chromosomal translocation. Janet D. Rowley specializes in Chromosomal translocation, namely Breakpoint.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Letter: A new consistent chromosomal abnormality in chronic myelogenous leukaemia identified by quinacrine fluorescence and Giemsa staining.

Janet D. Rowley.
Nature (1973)

5975 Citations

Fusion of the TEL gene on 12p13 to the AML1 gene on 21q22 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

T R Golub;G F Barker;S K Bohlander;S W Hiebert.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1995)

928 Citations

15/17 TRANSLOCATION, A CONSISTENT CHROMOSOMAL CHANGE IN ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKAEMIA

JanetD. Rowley;HarveyM. Golomb;Charlotte Dougherty.
The Lancet (1977)

862 Citations

Identification of breakpoints in t(8;21) acute myelogenous leukemia and isolation of a fusion transcript, AML1/ETO, with similarity to Drosophila segmentation gene, runt.

P Erickson;J Gao;KS Chang;T Look.
Blood (1992)

744 Citations

Clinical-cytogenetic associations in 306 patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia and myeloid leukemia: the University of Chicago series.

Sonali M. Smith;Michelle M. Le Beau;Dezheng Huo;Theodore Karrison.
Blood (2003)

721 Citations

Rearrangement of the MLL Gene in Acute Lymphoblastic and Acute Myeloid Leukemias with 11q23 Chromosomal Translocations

Michael J. Thirman;Heidi J. Gill;Robert C. Burnett;David Mbangkollo.
The New England Journal of Medicine (1993)

706 Citations

Nonrandom chromosome abnormalities in acute leukemia and dysmyelopoietic syndromes in patients with previously treated malignant disease

Janet D. Rowley;Harvey M. Golomb;James W. Vardiman.
Blood (1981)

654 Citations

MicroRNA expression signatures accurately discriminate acute lymphoblastic leukemia from acute myeloid leukemia

Shuangli Mi;Jun Lu;Jun Lu;Miao Sun;Zejuan Li.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2007)

629 Citations

Evidence for a 15; 17 translocation in every patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia

Richard A Larson;Koji Kondo;James W Vardiman;Ann E Butler.
The American Journal of Medicine (1984)

584 Citations

Dietary bioflavonoids induce cleavage in the MLL gene and may contribute to infant leukemia

Reiner Strick;Pamela L. Strissel;Susanne Borgers;Steve L. Smith.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2000)

553 Citations

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