H-Index & Metrics Top Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience H-index 66 Citations 27,644 112 World Ranking 1043 National Ranking 541

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2014 - Fellow, National Academy of Inventors

2011 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2008 - Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

2006 - Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering (INAE)

1989 - Fellow of American Physical Society (APS) Citation For continued contributions to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, especially in the studies of weak decays, CP violation, hadron spectroscopy, and chiral symmetry

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Neuroscience
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Neuron

John P. Donoghue mainly focuses on Neuroscience, Motor cortex, Primary motor cortex, Brain–computer interface and Artificial intelligence. His research investigates the connection between Neuroscience and topics such as Task that intersect with problems in Cortical neurons and Communication. His study in Motor cortex is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Electrophysiology, Motor skill, Anatomy and Primate.

John P. Donoghue conducts interdisciplinary study in the fields of Primary motor cortex and Population through his works. His studies deal with areas such as Physical medicine and rehabilitation, Spinal cord injury, Tetraplegia, BrainGate and Simulation as well as Brain–computer interface. His Artificial intelligence research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Computer vision and Neural decoding.

His most cited work include:

  • Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia (2533 citations)
  • Reach and grasp by people with tetraplegia using a neurally controlled robotic arm (1579 citations)
  • Reach and grasp by people with tetraplegia using a neurally controlled robotic arm (1579 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

John P. Donoghue focuses on Neuroscience, Motor cortex, Brain–computer interface, Artificial intelligence and Primary motor cortex. His work in Neuroscience addresses subjects such as Anatomy, which are connected to disciplines such as Cerebral cortex. His Motor cortex research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Local field potential, Neural coding and Motor skill.

He combines subjects such as Physical medicine and rehabilitation, Human–computer interaction, Tetraplegia, BrainGate and Signal with his study of Brain–computer interface. His biological study deals with issues like Decoding methods, which deal with fields such as Speech recognition and Kalman filter. The various areas that John P. Donoghue examines in his Primary motor cortex study include Parietal lobe, Trajectory and Motor control.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Neuroscience (47.74%)
  • Motor cortex (45.23%)
  • Brain–computer interface (38.19%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2020)?

  • Brain–computer interface (38.19%)
  • Neuroscience (47.74%)
  • Motor cortex (45.23%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Brain–computer interface, Neuroscience, Motor cortex, Physical medicine and rehabilitation and Tetraplegia. His work deals with themes such as Speech recognition, Human–computer interaction, Signal, Local field potential and Biomedical engineering, which intersect with Brain–computer interface. His work on Neuron, Brain mapping, Brain activity and meditation and Biological neural network as part of his general Neuroscience study is frequently connected to Action, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science.

In the subject of general Motor cortex, his work in Primary motor cortex is often linked to Population, thereby combining diverse domains of study. His research investigates the connection with Physical medicine and rehabilitation and areas like Physical therapy which intersect with concerns in Motor impairment. His Tetraplegia study incorporates themes from Robot, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Simulation.

Between 2012 and 2020, his most popular works were:

  • Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates (333 citations)
  • Failure mode analysis of silicon-based intracortical microelectrode arrays in non-human primates (333 citations)
  • Restoration of reaching and grasping movements through brain-controlled muscle stimulation in a person with tetraplegia: a proof-of-concept demonstration (320 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Neuroscience
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Neuron

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Brain–computer interface, Neuroscience, Tetraplegia, Physical medicine and rehabilitation and Signal. John P. Donoghue has included themes like Motor cortex, Local field potential and Biomedical engineering in his Brain–computer interface study. John P. Donoghue focuses mostly in the field of Motor cortex, narrowing it down to topics relating to Electroencephalography and, in certain cases, BrainGate and Motor control.

The concepts of his Local field potential study are interwoven with issues in Locked-in syndrome, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Primary motor cortex and Artificial intelligence. His work on Brain mapping and Brain circuit as part of general Neuroscience study is frequently linked to Biomarker, Deep brain stimulation and In patient, bridging the gap between disciplines. His research in Tetraplegia intersects with topics in Speech recognition, Closed loop and Physical therapy.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Top Publications

Neuronal ensemble control of prosthetic devices by a human with tetraplegia

Leigh R. Hochberg;Leigh R. Hochberg;Mijail D. Serruya;Gerhard M. Friehs;Gerhard M. Friehs;Jon A. Mukand;Jon A. Mukand.
Nature (2006)

3549 Citations

Reach and grasp by people with tetraplegia using a neurally controlled robotic arm

Leigh Robert Hochberg;Daniel Bacher;Beata Jarosiewicz;Beata Jarosiewicz;Nicolas Y. Masse.
Nature (2012)

2115 Citations

Instant neural control of a movement signal

Mijail D. Serruya;Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos;Nicholas G. Hatsopoulos;Liam Paninski;Liam Paninski;Matthew R. Fellows.
Nature (2002)

1650 Citations

Plasticity and primary motor cortex.

Jerome N. Sanes;John P. Donoghue.
Annual Review of Neuroscience (2000)

1420 Citations

Reshaping the cortical motor map by unmasking latent intracortical connections

Kimberle M. Jacobs;John P. Donoghue.
Science (1991)

1274 Citations

The motor cortex of the rat: cytoarchitecture and microstimulation mapping

John P. Donoghue;Steven P. Wise.
The Journal of Comparative Neurology (1982)

1153 Citations

A point process framework for relating neural spiking activity to spiking history, neural ensemble, and extrinsic covariate effects.

Wilson Truccolo;Uri T. Eden;Matthew R. Fellows;John P. Donoghue.
Journal of Neurophysiology (2005)

1053 Citations

Learning-induced LTP in neocortex.

Mengia-S. Rioult-Pedotti;Daniel Friedman;John P. Donoghue.
Science (2000)

1031 Citations

Connecting Cortex to Machines: Recent Advances in Brain Interfaces

John P. Donoghue.
Nature Neuroscience (2002)

951 Citations

Strengthening of horizontal cortical connections following skill learning

Mengia S. Rioult-Pedotti;Daniel Friedman;Grzegorz Hess;Grzegorz Hess;John P. Donoghue.
Nature Neuroscience (1998)

744 Citations

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking h-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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