D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Earth Science D-index 73 Citations 21,462 140 World Ranking 325 National Ranking 31

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

1996 - Geochemistry Fellow Honor, Geochemical Society and the European Association of Geochemistry

1987 - Fellow of the Royal Society, United Kingdom

1971 - Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science

Fellow of the Geological Society of America

GSA Honorary Fellow Award, The Geological Society of America

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Igneous rock
  • Paleontology
  • Basalt

William Compston spends much of his time researching Zircon, Geochemistry, Archean, Gneiss and Radiogenic nuclide. His Zircon research incorporates themes from Metamorphism, Felsic, Mineralogy and Geochronology. His study involves Igneous rock, Crust, Acasta Gneiss, Jack Hills and Protolith, a branch of Geochemistry.

His work carried out in the field of Archean brings together such families of science as Precambrian and Craton. The study incorporates disciplines such as Abundance, Radiometric dating and Shrimp in addition to Gneiss. His research in Radiogenic nuclide intersects with topics in Isotope analysis and Isotopic composition.

His most cited work include:

  • U‐Pb geochronology of zircons from lunar breccia 73217 using a sensitive high mass‐resolution ion microprobe (1184 citations)
  • Remnants of ≥3800 Ma crust in the Chinese part of the Sino-Korean craton (1033 citations)
  • Zircon U-Pb ages for the Early Cambrian time-scale (935 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Geochemistry, Zircon, Archean, Mineralogy and Gneiss. His Geochemistry study focuses mostly on Metamorphism, Igneous rock, Precambrian, Basalt and Crust. In Zircon, he works on issues like Geochronology, which are connected to Jack Hills.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Metamorphic rock, Craton and Continental crust. His Mineralogy research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Chondrite, Meteorite, Isochron and Analytical chemistry. His Gneiss study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Terrane, Yilgarn Craton and Protolith.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Geochemistry (70.97%)
  • Zircon (42.58%)
  • Archean (25.81%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 1993-2014)?

  • Zircon (42.58%)
  • Geochemistry (70.97%)
  • Geochronology (14.84%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His main research concerns Zircon, Geochemistry, Geochronology, Paleontology and Igneous rock. His study deals with a combination of Zircon and Population. His Geochemistry study frequently links to other fields, such as Terrane.

His studies in Igneous rock integrate themes in fields like Overprinting, Lunar magma ocean, Aegirine, Carbonatite and Bastnäsite. In his research on the topic of Proterozoic, Archaeology is strongly related with Precambrian. His Metamorphism research integrates issues from Granulite and Metamorphic facies.

Between 1993 and 2014, his most popular works were:

  • Multiple zircon growth and recrystallization during polyphase Late Carboniferous to Triassic metamorphism in granulites of the Ivrea Zone (Southern Alps): an ion microprobe (SHRIMP) study (608 citations)
  • Mixture modeling of multi-component data sets with application to ion-probe zircon ages (409 citations)
  • Ion microprobe U–Pb ages for Neoproterozoic basaltic magmatism in south-central Australia and implications for the breakup of Rodinia (325 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Igneous rock
  • Paleontology
  • Basalt

His primary areas of study are Zircon, Geochemistry, Geochronology, Population and Baddeleyite. His Zircon study is related to the wider topic of Paleontology. His research brings together the fields of Craton and Geochemistry.

He combines subjects such as Group, Supergroup, Sedimentary depositional environment, Pilbara Craton and Lithology with his study of Geochronology. His studies deal with areas such as Analytical chemistry, Ion beam and Monazite as well as Baddeleyite. His work carried out in the field of Borehole brings together such families of science as Volcanic rock, Acritarch, Precambrian, Apparent age and Archean.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

U‐Pb geochronology of zircons from lunar breccia 73217 using a sensitive high mass‐resolution ion microprobe

W. Compston;I. S. Williams;C. Meyer.
Journal of Geophysical Research (1984)

1720 Citations

Zircon U-Pb ages for the Early Cambrian time-scale

W. Compston;I. S. Williams;J. L. Kirschvink;Zhang Zichao.
Journal of the Geological Society (1992)

1640 Citations

Remnants of ≥3800 Ma crust in the Chinese part of the Sino-Korean craton

D. Y. Liu;A. P. Nutman;W. Compston;J. S. Wu.
Geology (1992)

1414 Citations

Multiple zircon growth and recrystallization during polyphase Late Carboniferous to Triassic metamorphism in granulites of the Ivrea Zone (Southern Alps): an ion microprobe (SHRIMP) study

G. Vavra;Dieter Gebauer;Rolf Schmid;William Compston.
Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology (1996)

946 Citations

The statistical assessment of Rb‐Sr isochrons

G. A. McIntyre;C. Brooks;W. Compston;A. Turek.
Journal of Geophysical Research (1966)

693 Citations

Mixture modeling of multi-component data sets with application to ion-probe zircon ages

M.S. Sambridge;W. Compston.
Earth and Planetary Science Letters (1994)

534 Citations

Ion microprobe identification of 4,100–4,200 Myr-old terrestrial zircons

D. O. Froude;T. R. Ireland;P. D. Kinny;I. S. Williams.
Nature (1983)

506 Citations

Jack Hills, evidence of more very old detrital zircons in Western Australia

W. Compston;R. T. Pidgeon.
Nature (1986)

501 Citations

Zircon ion microprobe studies bearing on the age and evolution of the Witwatersrand triad

R.A. Armstrong;R.A. Armstrong;W. Compston;E.A. Retief;I.S. Williams.
Precambrian Research (1991)

452 Citations

Ion microprobe U–Pb ages for Neoproterozoic basaltic magmatism in south-central Australia and implications for the breakup of Rodinia

Michael T.D Wingate;Ian H Campbell;William Compston;George M Gibson.
Precambrian Research (1998)

424 Citations

Best Scientists Citing William Compston

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Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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