D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 40 Citations 5,844 126 World Ranking 17227 National Ranking 514

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Ecology
  • Genus
  • Virus

Ecology, Virology, Vector, Aedes aegypti and Dengue fever are his primary areas of study. His Ecology study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Insect bites and stings and Ross River virus. His study in the field of Arbovirus and Encephalitis is also linked to topics like Kunjin virus, Orbivirus and Liao ning virus.

His Vector research integrates issues from Zoology, Cartography, Climate change and Aedes. His Aedes aegypti research includes elements of Mosquito control, Population sampling and Quarantine. In his study, which falls under the umbrella issue of Dengue fever, Barmah Forest virus is strongly linked to Japanese encephalitis.

His most cited work include:

  • Ross River virus: ecology and distribution. (247 citations)
  • Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options (183 citations)
  • The Resurgence of Bed Bugs in Australia: With Notes on Their Ecology and Control (151 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His main research concerns Ecology, Zoology, Vector, Aedes aegypti and Disease prevention. Culex annulirostris, Larva, Aedes, Aedes albopictus and Culex are among the areas of Ecology where he concentrates his study. The study incorporates disciplines such as Virology, Arbovirus, Climate change, Veterinary medicine and Biological dispersal in addition to Vector.

His work investigates the relationship between Arbovirus and topics such as Barmah Forest virus that intersect with problems in Outbreak. His Aedes aegypti study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Mosquito control, Toxicology, DEET and Dengue fever. Richard C. Russell integrates Dengue fever and Socioeconomics in his research.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Ecology (36.49%)
  • Zoology (20.85%)
  • Vector (17.54%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2012-2021)?

  • Disease control (15.17%)
  • Disease prevention (15.17%)
  • Zoology (20.85%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Disease control, Disease prevention, Zoology, Ecology and Veterinary medicine are his primary areas of study. The concepts of his Zoology study are interwoven with issues in Myiasis, Toxicology and Skin lesion. His Ecology study incorporates themes from Mosquito control and Vector.

His Mosquito control research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Chikungunya, Fishery, Quarantine, Zika virus and Aedes aegypti. His work carried out in the field of Vector brings together such families of science as Culex, Abundance, Ecology and Diapause. His work on Babesiosis as part of general Veterinary medicine research is frequently linked to ANAPLASMOSES, bridging the gap between disciplines.

Between 2012 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Enhanced arbovirus surveillance with deep sequencing: Identification of novel rhabdoviruses and bunyaviruses in Australian mosquitoes. (77 citations)
  • Enhanced arbovirus surveillance with deep sequencing: Identification of novel rhabdoviruses and bunyaviruses in Australian mosquitoes. (77 citations)
  • Tracing the tiger: population genetics provides valuable insights into the Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus invasion of the Australasian Region. (60 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Ecology
  • Genus
  • Virus

Richard C. Russell focuses on Ecology, Aedes albopictus, Range, Mainland and Aedes. His studies deal with areas such as Mosquito control and Vector as well as Ecology. His research in Vector intersects with topics in Culex, Ecology, Abundance and Diapause.

As a part of the same scientific study, Richard C. Russell usually deals with the Range, concentrating on Wetland and frequently concerns with Biological dispersal, Urban planning and Outbreak. The Mainland study combines topics in areas such as Aedes aegypti, Fishery, Quarantine and Zika virus. His research investigates the connection with Habitat and areas like Biodiversity which intersect with concerns in Public health.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Ross River virus: ecology and distribution.

Richard C. Russell.
Annual Review of Entomology (2002)

381 Citations

Bed Bugs: Clinical Relevance and Control Options

Stephen L. Doggett;Dominic E. Dwyer;Pablo F. Peñas;Richard C. Russell.
Clinical Microbiology Reviews (2012)

285 Citations

The Resurgence of Bed Bugs in Australia: With Notes on Their Ecology and Control

Stephen L Doggett;Merilyn J Geary;Richard C Russell.
Environmental Health (2004)

229 Citations

Mosquito-borne arboviruses in Australia: the current scene and implications of climate change for human health.

Richard C Russell.
International Journal for Parasitology (1998)

215 Citations

Mark–release–recapture study to measure dispersal of the mosquito Aedes aegypti in Cairns, Queensland, Australia

R. C. Russell;C. E. Webb;C. R. Williams;S. A. Ritchie;S. A. Ritchie.
Medical and Veterinary Entomology (2005)

196 Citations

Clinical and neurophysiological features of tick paralysis.

P J Grattan-Smith;J G Morris;H M Johnston;C Yiannikas.
Brain (1997)

189 Citations

Arboviruses associated with human diseasein Australia

Richard C Russell;Dominic E Dwyer.
Microbes and Infection (2000)

178 Citations

Arboviruses and their vectors in Australia: an update on the ecology and epidemiology of some mosquito-borne arboviruses

R.C. Russell.
Review of Medical and Veterinary Entomology (United Kingdom) (1995)

173 Citations

Field efficacy of the BG-Sentinel compared with CDC Backpack Aspirators and CO2-baited EVS traps for collection of adult Aedes aegypti in Cairns, Queensland, Australia.

Craig R. Williams;Sharron A. Long;Richard C. Russell;Scott A. Ritchie;Scott A. Ritchie.
Journal of The American Mosquito Control Association (2006)

168 Citations

Vectors vs. humans in Australia--who is on top down under? An update on vector-borne disease and research on vectors in Australia.

R C Russell.
Journal of Vector Ecology (1998)

166 Citations

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