H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Neuroscience D-index 40 Citations 6,234 110 World Ranking 3306 National Ranking 1503

Overview

What is she best known for?

The fields of study she is best known for:

  • Internal medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Ecology

Karen L. Bales mainly investigates Oxytocin, Endocrinology, Internal medicine, Vasopressin and Neuropeptide. Her Oxytocin research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Developmental psychology, Autism, Alloparenting and Microtus. Her Endocrinology research incorporates themes from Seasonal breeder, Dominance hierarchy, Reproductive suppression and Tamarin.

Her studies deal with areas such as Zoology, Cooperative breeding, Leontopithecus rosalia, Leontopithecus and Nasal administration as well as Internal medicine. The various areas that she examines in her Vasopressin study include Vasopressin receptor, Hypothalamus and Prairie vole. Her study in Neuropeptide is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both Pharmacokinetics, Nasal spray, Cerebrospinal fluid and Central nervous system.

Her most cited work include:

  • Why primate models matter (267 citations)
  • Why primate models matter (267 citations)
  • Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles (175 citations)

What are the main themes of her work throughout her whole career to date?

Karen L. Bales mostly deals with Endocrinology, Internal medicine, Oxytocin, Titi and Vasopressin. Her Endocrinology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Prairie vole and Leontopithecus rosalia. Internal medicine connects with themes related to Aggression in her study.

The study incorporates disciplines such as Neuropeptide, Developmental psychology, Autism and Physiology in addition to Oxytocin. Karen L. Bales interconnects Pair bond and Primate in the investigation of issues within Titi. Her biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Stimulus, Microtus and Amygdala.

She most often published in these fields:

  • Endocrinology (57.87%)
  • Internal medicine (57.87%)
  • Oxytocin (32.99%)

What were the highlights of her more recent work (between 2018-2021)?

  • Titi (35.03%)
  • Primate (25.38%)
  • Endocrinology (57.87%)

In recent papers she was focusing on the following fields of study:

Karen L. Bales mainly focuses on Titi, Primate, Endocrinology, Internal medicine and Offspring. Her Titi research integrates issues from Pair bond and Anxiolytic. Her research links Pregnancy with Endocrinology.

Her Offspring research incorporates elements of Testosterone, Digit ratio, Estrogen and Sexual dimorphism. Her biological study deals with issues like Elevated plus maze, which deal with fields such as Microtus. The concepts of her Oxytocin study are interwoven with issues in Vasopressin, Prairie vole and Nasal administration.

Between 2018 and 2021, her most popular works were:

  • Early nurture epigenetically tunes the oxytocin receptor. (36 citations)
  • Mothers, Fathers, and Others: Neural Substrates of Parental Care (9 citations)
  • Mothers, Fathers, and Others: Neural Substrates of Parental Care (9 citations)

In her most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Internal medicine
  • Neuroscience
  • Ecology

Karen L. Bales spends much of her time researching Titi, Developmental psychology, Offspring, Primate and Plecturocebus cupreus. Her work carried out in the field of Titi brings together such families of science as Endocrinology, Sex hormone-binding globulin, Internal medicine, Autism and Physiology. Her Developmental psychology study combines topics in areas such as Altricial and Paternal care.

Her research integrates issues of Testosterone, Digit ratio, Estrogen and Sexual dimorphism in her study of Offspring. Karen L. Bales has included themes like Cognitive psychology, Social neuroscience, Autism spectrum disorder and Rhesus macaque in her Primate study. Her Plecturocebus cupreus study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Pair bond, Social bonding, Longevity, Animal model and Novelty.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Why primate models matter

Kimberley A. Phillips;Karen L. Bales;Karen L. Bales;John P. Capitanio;John P. Capitanio;Alan Conley.
American Journal of Primatology (2014)

325 Citations

Chronic intranasal oxytocin causes long-term impairments in partner preference formation in male prairie voles

Karen L. Bales;Karen L. Bales;Allison M. Perkeybile;Olivia G. Conley;Meredith H. Lee.
Biological Psychiatry (2013)

212 Citations

Sex differences and developmental effects of oxytocin on aggression and social behavior in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

Karen L Bales;C.Sue Carter.
Hormones and Behavior (2003)

208 Citations

Both oxytocin and vasopressin may influence alloparental behavior in male prairie voles

Karen L Bales;Albert J Kim;Antoniah D Lewis-Reese;C Sue Carter.
Hormones and Behavior (2004)

207 Citations

Developmental exposure to oxytocin facilitates partner preferences in male prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster).

Karen L. Bales;C. Sue Carter.
Behavioral Neuroscience (2003)

196 Citations

Oxytocin has dose-dependent developmental effects on pair-bonding and alloparental care in female prairie voles

Karen L. Bales;Julie A. van Westerhuyzen;Antoniah D. Lewis-Reese;Nathaniel D. Grotte.
Hormones and Behavior (2007)

192 Citations

Neonatal oxytocin manipulations have long-lasting, sexually dimorphic effects on vasopressin receptors

K.L. Bales;P.M. Plotsky;L.J. Young;L.J. Young;M.M. Lim;M.M. Lim.
Neuroscience (2007)

168 Citations

Consequences of early experiences and exposure to oxytocin and vasopressin are sexually dimorphic.

C. Sue Carter;Ericka M. Boone;Ericka M. Boone;Hossein Pournajafi-Nazarloo;Karen L. Bales.
Developmental Neuroscience (2009)

161 Citations

Cross-Species Transmission of a Novel Adenovirus Associated with a Fulminant Pneumonia Outbreak in a New World Monkey Colony

Eunice C. Chen;Shigeo Yagi;Kristi R. Kelly;Sally P. Mendoza.
PLOS Pathogens (2011)

150 Citations

Sex differences and developmental effects of manipulations of oxytocin on alloparenting and anxiety in prairie voles

Karen L. Bales;Lisa A. Pfeifer;C. Sue Carter.
Developmental Psychobiology (2004)

149 Citations

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