D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Economics and Finance D-index 109 Citations 44,753 462 World Ranking 28 National Ranking 23

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2005 - Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association

1977 - John Bates Clark Medal, the American Economic Association

Elected Fellow of the European Economic Association

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • World War II
  • Law
  • Finance

His primary areas of study are Monetary economics, Social security, Labour economics, Public economics and State income tax. His research in Monetary economics intersects with topics in Capital, Capital accumulation and Stock market. His Social security study incorporates themes from Pension, Government, Government spending, Actuarial science and Sample.

Martin Feldstein has included themes like State, Deadweight loss, Incentive, Double taxation and Unemployment in his Labour economics study. His State income tax research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Income tax, Indirect tax and Value-added tax. In his study, Lump-sum tax is strongly linked to Ad valorem tax, which falls under the umbrella field of Indirect tax.

His most cited work include:

  • Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows (2103 citations)
  • Social Security, Induced Retirement, and Aggregate Capital Accumulation (1221 citations)
  • Domestic savings and international capital flows (773 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Monetary economics, Social security, Labour economics, Public economics and Inflation. His work carried out in the field of Monetary economics brings together such families of science as Capital, Investment and Liberian dollar. His Social security research integrates issues from Actuarial science, Pension, Rate of return and Capital accumulation.

Martin Feldstein combines subjects such as Value-added tax, Tax reform, Indirect tax, State income tax and Unemployment with his study of Labour economics. Ad valorem tax is closely connected to Direct tax in his research, which is encompassed under the umbrella topic of Indirect tax. His study with Inflation involves better knowledge in Macroeconomics.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Monetary economics (33.72%)
  • Social security (21.18%)
  • Labour economics (22.07%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2007-2019)?

  • Monetary economics (33.72%)
  • International economics (8.83%)
  • Liberian dollar (10.86%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Martin Feldstein mostly deals with Monetary economics, International economics, Liberian dollar, Revenue and Economic policy. His Monetary economics research incorporates themes from Tax reform, Indirect tax, Value-added tax and Investment. His Tax reform research incorporates elements of Tax rate and Labour economics.

The International economics study combines topics in areas such as International trade, Bureaucracy, Economic problem and Unemployment. In his research, Consumption, Current account and Value is intimately related to Balance of trade, which falls under the overarching field of Liberian dollar. The study incorporates disciplines such as Developing country, Public economics and Fiscal incentives in addition to Revenue.

Between 2007 and 2019, his most popular works were:

  • 100 Years of the American Economic Review: The Top 20 Articles (112 citations)
  • Rethinking the Role of Fiscal Policy (83 citations)
  • Does the United States Save Too Little (63 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • World War II
  • Law
  • Finance

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Monetary economics, Inflation, Stimulus, Revenue and International economics. His Monetary economics research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Debt-to-GDP ratio, Labour economics and Social security. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Balance of trade and Liberian dollar.

In Social security, Martin Feldstein works on issues like Administration, which are connected to Medicaid. His work deals with themes such as Productivity, European integration and Measures of national income and output, which intersect with Inflation. He has researched Revenue in several fields, including Labor income, Estimation, Public economics and Macroeconomics.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Domestic savings and international capital flows

Martin Feldstein;Charles Horioka.
(1979)

4850 Citations

Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows

Martin Feldstein;Charles Horioka.
The Economic Journal (1980)

3407 Citations

Social Security, Induced Retirement, and Aggregate Capital Accumulation

Martin Feldstein.
Journal of Political Economy (1974)

1946 Citations

The Effect of Marginal Tax Rates on Taxable Income: A Panel Study of the 1986 Tax Reform Act

Martin Feldstein.
Journal of Political Economy (1995)

927 Citations

TAX AVOIDANCE AND THE DEADWEIGHT LOSS OF THE INCOME TAX

Martin Feldstein.
The Review of Economics and Statistics (1999)

801 Citations

The Welfare Loss of Excess Health Insurance

Martin S. Feldstein.
Journal of Political Economy (1973)

627 Citations

Temporary Layoffs in the Theory of Unemployment

Martin Feldstein.
Journal of Political Economy (1976)

617 Citations

National Saving and International Investment

Martin Feldstein;Philippe Bacchetta.
National Bureau of Economic Research (1991)

593 Citations

On the theory of tax reform

Martin Feldstein.
Journal of Public Economics (1976)

545 Citations

Government deficits and aggregate demand

Martin Feldstein;Martin Feldstein.
Journal of Monetary Economics (1982)

497 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Martin Feldstein

Alan J. Auerbach

Alan J. Auerbach

University of California, Berkeley

Publications: 78

Olivia S. Mitchell

Olivia S. Mitchell

University of Pennsylvania

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James M. Poterba

James M. Poterba

MIT

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Laurence J. Kotlikoff

Laurence J. Kotlikoff

Boston University

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Joel Slemrod

Joel Slemrod

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

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Emmanuel Saez

Emmanuel Saez

University of California, Berkeley

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James R. Hines

James R. Hines

University of Michigan–Ann Arbor

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Jeffrey A. Frankel

Jeffrey A. Frankel

Harvard University

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R. Glenn Hubbard

R. Glenn Hubbard

Columbia University

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Mihir A. Desai

Mihir A. Desai

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Axel Börsch-Supan

Axel Börsch-Supan

Max Planck Society

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Raj Chetty

Raj Chetty

Harvard University

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Tullio Jappelli

Tullio Jappelli

University of Naples Federico II

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Don Fullerton

Don Fullerton

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Roger H. Gordon

Roger H. Gordon

University of California, San Diego

Publications: 34

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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