D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines.

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Chemistry D-index 67 Citations 16,452 249 World Ranking 4223 National Ranking 253

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2000 - Corday–Morgan Prize, Royal Society of Chemistry (UK)

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Catalysis
  • Organic chemistry
  • Alkene

His primary scientific interests are in Catalysis, Organic chemistry, Ruthenium, Borrowing hydrogen and Medicinal chemistry. He interconnects Wittig reaction and Amine gas treating in the investigation of issues within Catalysis. Amide, Primary, Molecule, Alkylation and Alcohol are the core of his Organic chemistry study.

His Ruthenium study combines topics in areas such as Alcohol oxidation, Bond formation, Hydride and Hydrogen transfer. Jonathan M. J. Williams has researched Borrowing hydrogen in several fields, including Hydrogen and Photochemistry. His Medicinal chemistry research integrates issues from Yield and Carbene.

His most cited work include:

  • Borrowing hydrogen in the activation of alcohols (753 citations)
  • Metal-catalysed approaches to amide bond formation (640 citations)
  • Transition metal catalysed reactions of alcohols using borrowing hydrogen methodology (472 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

Jonathan M. J. Williams mainly investigates Organic chemistry, Catalysis, Ruthenium, Medicinal chemistry and Allylic rearrangement. Enantioselective synthesis, Primary, Alkylation, Alcohol oxidation and Alcohol are subfields of Organic chemistry in which his conducts study. His work carried out in the field of Catalysis brings together such families of science as Combinatorial chemistry and Polymer chemistry.

His studies in Ruthenium integrate themes in fields like Photochemistry, Xantphos, Molecule, Hydrogen transfer and Isomerization. His Medicinal chemistry research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Yield and Carbene. His Allylic rearrangement research includes themes of Ligand, Nucleophile and Palladium.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Organic chemistry (58.88%)
  • Catalysis (55.76%)
  • Ruthenium (22.74%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2009-2021)?

  • Catalysis (55.76%)
  • Organic chemistry (58.88%)
  • Ruthenium (22.74%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

Catalysis, Organic chemistry, Ruthenium, Medicinal chemistry and Primary are his primary areas of study. His Catalysis study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Combinatorial chemistry, Polymer chemistry and Amide. The Ruthenium study combines topics in areas such as Photochemistry, Hydrogen, Hydrogen transfer and Isomerization.

His Medicinal chemistry study also includes fields such as

  • Yield, which have a strong connection to Iron catalyzed, Cyclopentadienone and Homogeneous catalysis,
  • Allylic rearrangement together with Palladium. His studies deal with areas such as Scandium, 1,5-Diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene and Trifluoromethanesulfonate as well as Primary. The concepts of his Borrowing hydrogen study are interwoven with issues in Alcohol, Inorganic chemistry and Alkyl.

Between 2009 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Metal-catalysed approaches to amide bond formation (640 citations)
  • The Give and Take of Alcohol Activation (398 citations)
  • Amidines, isothioureas, and guanidines as nucleophilic catalysts. (271 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Organic chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Alkene

His primary areas of study are Organic chemistry, Catalysis, Ruthenium, Primary and Amide. His study in Acylation, Nucleophile, Copper, Toluene and Reaction conditions are all subfields of Organic chemistry. He combines subjects such as Hydrogen and Amine gas treating with his study of Catalysis.

His Ruthenium research is multidisciplinary, relying on both Inorganic chemistry, Photochemistry, Dimethylamine and Medicinal chemistry. Jonathan M. J. Williams has included themes like Bond formation, Zinc, Zinc salts and Indium in his Primary study. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Coupling reaction, Palladium, Carbon monoxide, Peptide bond and Aryl.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Metal-catalysed approaches to amide bond formation

C. Liana Allen;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Chemical Society Reviews (2011)

1158 Citations

Borrowing hydrogen in the activation of alcohols

Malai Haniti S. A. Hamid;Paul A. Slatford;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis (2007)

1033 Citations

The Give and Take of Alcohol Activation

Andrew J. A. Watson;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Science (2010)

747 Citations

Selectivity in palladium catalysed allylic substitution

Christopher G Frost;Joshua Howarth;J.M.J. Williams.
Tetrahedron-asymmetry (1992)

694 Citations

Asymmetric palladium catalysed allylic substitution using phosphorus containing oxazoline ligands

Graham J. Dawson;Christopher G. Frost;Jonathan M.J. Williams;Steven J. Coote.
Tetrahedron Letters (1993)

608 Citations

Ruthenium-catalyzed N-alkylation of amines and sulfonamides using borrowing hydrogen methodology.

M. Haniti S. A. Hamid;C. Liana Allen;Gareth W. Lamb;Aoife C. Maxwell.
Journal of the American Chemical Society (2009)

597 Citations

Transition metal catalysed reactions of alcohols using borrowing hydrogen methodology

Tracy D. Nixon;Michael K. Whittlesey;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Dalton Transactions (2009)

544 Citations

Amidines, isothioureas, and guanidines as nucleophilic catalysts.

James E Taylor;Steven D Bull;Jonathan M J Williams.
Chemical Society Reviews (2012)

437 Citations

Direct amide formation from unactivated carboxylic acids and amines

C. Liana Allen;A. Rosie Chhatwal;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Chemical Communications (2012)

353 Citations

Ruthenium-Catalyzed Oxidation of Alcohols into Amides

Andrew J. A. Watson;Aoife C. Maxwell;Jonathan M. J. Williams.
Organic Letters (2009)

336 Citations

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