D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 58 Citations 9,834 83 World Ranking 6382 National Ranking 491

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Virus
  • Ecology
  • Virology

His primary areas of study are Culicoides, Virology, Outbreak, Ceratopogonidae and Culicoides obsoletus. His Culicoides imicola study, which is part of a larger body of work in Culicoides, is frequently linked to Basement lamina, bridging the gap between disciplines. His study on Virus and Arbovirus Infections is often connected to Socioeconomics and Single layer as part of broader study in Virology.

In his study, Basic reproduction number, Uncertainty analysis, Infectious disease and Taxonomy is strongly linked to Livestock, which falls under the umbrella field of Outbreak. His Ceratopogonidae study also includes

  • Midge which is related to area like Entomology,
  • African horse sickness which connect with African Horse Sickness Virus. His Vector research includes elements of Range, Bluetongue disease and Epizootic.

His most cited work include:

  • Culicoides biting midges: their role as arbovirus vectors. (732 citations)
  • Bluetongue epidemiology in the European Union. (310 citations)
  • Bluetongue virus in the Mediterranean Basin 1998-2001. (298 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary scientific interests are in Culicoides, Virology, Ceratopogonidae, Virus and Veterinary medicine. His study in Culicoides is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing from both African Horse Sickness Virus, Vector and African horse sickness, Outbreak. When carried out as part of a general Virology research project, his work on Serotype, Arbovirus and Viral replication is frequently linked to work in Orbivirus, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of study.

His work on Culicoides imicola as part of his general Ceratopogonidae study is frequently connected to Species complex, thereby bridging the divide between different branches of science. His Virus research includes themes of Inoculation and Serology. Philip S. Mellor combines subjects such as Akabane virus and Vaccination with his study of Veterinary medicine.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Culicoides (49.21%)
  • Virology (41.27%)
  • Ceratopogonidae (36.51%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2009-2017)?

  • Culicoides (49.21%)
  • Virology (41.27%)
  • Veterinary medicine (28.57%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of investigation include Culicoides, Virology, Veterinary medicine, Outbreak and Ceratopogonidae. In his research on the topic of Culicoides, Equidae, Culicoides imicola and Larva is strongly related with African horse sickness. His work on Virus and Arbovirus as part of general Virology study is frequently linked to Orbivirus, therefore connecting diverse disciplines of science.

In his research, Vaccination, Epizootic and Interquartile range is intimately related to Serotype, which falls under the overarching field of Veterinary medicine. As a part of the same scientific study, Philip S. Mellor usually deals with the Outbreak, concentrating on Livestock and frequently concerns with Herd, Environmental change, Climate change and Seroprevalence. His research integrates issues of Vector and African Horse Sickness Virus in his study of Ceratopogonidae.

Between 2009 and 2017, his most popular works were:

  • Temperature Dependence of the Extrinsic Incubation Period of Orbiviruses in Culicoides Biting Midges (88 citations)
  • The spread of bluetongue virus serotype 8 in Great Britain and its control by vaccination. (59 citations)
  • Investigating Incursions of Bluetongue Virus Using a Model of Long-Distance Culicoides Biting Midge Dispersal (53 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Virus
  • Ecology
  • Genetics

The scientist’s investigation covers issues in Culicoides, Ceratopogonidae, Veterinary medicine, Outbreak and Range. Philip S. Mellor combines Culicoides and Positive predicative value in his research. Philip S. Mellor regularly ties together related areas like Vector in his Ceratopogonidae studies.

His Arthropod Vector study in the realm of Vector connects with subjects such as Orbivirus. The various areas that Philip S. Mellor examines in his Outbreak study include Biting midge, Virus, Vaccine efficacy, Vaccination and Biological dispersal. The Virology study combines topics in areas such as Evolutionary biology and Livestock.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Culicoides biting midges: their role as arbovirus vectors.

P. S. Mellor;J. Boorman;M. Baylis.
Annual Review of Entomology (2000)

1078 Citations

Bluetongue epidemiology in the European Union.

Claude Saegerman;Dirk Berkvens;Philip S. Mellor.
Emerging Infectious Diseases (2008)

480 Citations

Bluetongue virus in the Mediterranean Basin 1998-2001.

P.S. Mellor;E.J. Wittmann.
Veterinary Journal (2002)

455 Citations

Bluetongue in Europe: past, present and future

Anthony J. Wilson;Philip S. Mellor.
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (2009)

405 Citations

African horse sickness.

Philip Scott Mellor;Christopher Hamblin.
Veterinary Research (1998)

390 Citations

Bluetongue virus: virology, pathogenesis and immunity.

Isabelle Schwartz-Cornil;Peter P C Mertens;Vanessa Contreras;Behzad Hemati.
Veterinary Research (2008)

329 Citations

Culicoides and the emergence of bluetongue virus in northern Europe

Simon Carpenter;Anthony Wilson;Philip S. Mellor.
Trends in Microbiology (2009)

273 Citations

The transmission and geographical spread of African horse sickness and bluetongue viruses

P S Mellor;J Boorman.
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology (1995)

251 Citations

Identification of a novel bluetongue virus vector species of Culicoides in Sicily.

S. Caracappa;A. Torina;A. Guercio;F. Vitale.
Veterinary Record (2003)

225 Citations

The replication of bluetongue virus in Culicoides vectors.

P. S. Mellor.
Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology (1990)

215 Citations

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Best Scientists Citing Philip S. Mellor

Peter P. C. Mertens

Peter P. C. Mertens

University of Nottingham

Publications: 120

Stéphan Zientara

Stéphan Zientara

Université Paris Cité

Publications: 88

Matthew Baylis

Matthew Baylis

University of Liverpool

Publications: 67

Claire Garros

Claire Garros

INRAE : Institut national de recherche pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement

Publications: 53

Gert J. Venter

Gert J. Venter

University of Pretoria

Publications: 53

Simon Gubbins

Simon Gubbins

The Pirbright Institute

Publications: 46

Giovanni Savini

Giovanni Savini

Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale dell'Abruzzo e del Molise G. Caporale

Publications: 43

Polly Roy

Polly Roy

University of London

Publications: 43

Bernd Hoffmann

Bernd Hoffmann

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut

Publications: 43

Martin Beer

Martin Beer

Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut

Publications: 42

Thierry Baldet

Thierry Baldet

INRAE : Institut national de recherche pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement

Publications: 41

José Manuel Sánchez-Vizcaíno

José Manuel Sánchez-Vizcaíno

Complutense University of Madrid

Publications: 38

Bethan V. Purse

Bethan V. Purse

University of Glasgow

Publications: 32

Armin R.W. Elbers

Armin R.W. Elbers

Wageningen University & Research

Publications: 29

Claude Saegerman

Claude Saegerman

University of Liège

Publications: 26

Bradley A. Mullens

Bradley A. Mullens

University of California, Riverside

Publications: 23

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