H-Index & Metrics Best Publications

H-Index & Metrics

Discipline name H-index Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Biology and Biochemistry D-index 51 Citations 9,051 142 World Ranking 9903 National Ranking 4338

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Gene
  • Bacteria
  • Genetics

Genetics, Phylogenetics, Phylogenetic tree, Yersinia pestis and Ecology are his primary areas of study. The Phylogenetics study combines topics in areas such as Genotype, Population genetics and Genetic diversity. His studies deal with areas such as Francisella tularensis, Subspecies, Disease reservoir and Molecular epidemiology as well as Phylogenetic tree.

The concepts of his Yersinia pestis study are interwoven with issues in Virology, Plague, Genome, Ancient DNA and Microevolution. His Ecology study combines topics in areas such as Phylogeography and Disease. His Microbiology research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Salmonella enterica and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

His most cited work include:

  • Microevolution and history of the plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis (400 citations)
  • Yersinia pestis genome sequencing identifies patterns of global phylogenetic diversity (397 citations)
  • Multiple antimicrobial resistance in plague: an emerging public health risk. (309 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of study are Genetics, Microbiology, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and Genome. His research related to Genotyping, Phylogenetics, Multiple Loci VNTR Analysis, Single-nucleotide polymorphism and Genotype might be considered part of Genetics. In his study, Virology, Phylogenetic tree and Subspecies is inextricably linked to Francisella tularensis, which falls within the broad field of Microbiology.

His Yersinia pestis research includes themes of Zoology, Plague, Outbreak, Bubonic plague and Central Highlands. David M. Wagner has researched Burkholderia pseudomallei in several fields, including Gene mutation, Melioidosis, Multilocus sequence typing and Burkholderia. His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Genetic variability and DNA sequencing.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Genetics (39.13%)
  • Microbiology (30.43%)
  • Yersinia pestis (21.74%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2017-2021)?

  • Microbiology (30.43%)
  • Virology (16.77%)
  • Whole genome sequencing (9.94%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

David M. Wagner mostly deals with Microbiology, Virology, Whole genome sequencing, Genome and Burkholderia pseudomallei. His work on Feces as part of general Microbiology research is frequently linked to Clostridium difficile, bridging the gap between disciplines. His Whole genome sequencing research is classified as research in Genetics.

His research integrates issues of Computational biology and Antibiotic resistance in his study of Genome. His Burkholderia pseudomallei research integrates issues from Burkholderia cepacia complex, Burkholderia and Melioidosis. His work in Phylogenetic tree covers topics such as Dermacentor which are related to areas like Phylogenetics.

Between 2017 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • Trends of Human Plague, Madagascar, 1998–2016 (19 citations)
  • Human plague: An old scourge that needs new answers. (16 citations)
  • Tracking the Increase of Acaricide Resistance in an Invasive Population of Cattle Fever Ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and Implementation of Real-Time PCR Assays to Rapidly Genotype Resistance Mutations (12 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Gene
  • Bacteria
  • DNA

His primary areas of study are Tick, Phylogenetic tree, Phylogenetics, Zoology and Case fatality rate. The various areas that David M. Wagner examines in his Phylogenetic tree study include Burkholderia cepacia complex, Burkholderia and Melioidosis. His research in Phylogenetics intersects with topics in Coxiella burnetii, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Dermacentor variabilis and Dermacentor.

His Case fatality rate research incorporates themes from Bubonic plague, Pneumonic plague, Yersinia pestis and Pediatrics. His Pneumonic plague research incorporates elements of One Health, Plague and Outbreak. His work blends Yersinia pestis and Economic growth studies together.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Microevolution and history of the plague bacillus, Yersinia pestis

Mark Achtman;Giovanna Morelli;Peixuan Zhu;Thierry Wirth.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2004)

590 Citations

Yersinia pestis genome sequencing identifies patterns of global phylogenetic diversity

Giovanna Morelli;Yajun Song;Yajun Song;Camila J Mazzoni;Mark Eppinger.
Nature Genetics (2010)

586 Citations

Molecular epidemiology, evolution, and ecology of Francisella.

Paul Keim;Anders Johansson;David M. Wagner.
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (2007)

412 Citations

Multiple antimicrobial resistance in plague: an emerging public health risk.

Timothy J. Welch;W. Florian Fricke;Patrick F. McDermott;David G. White.
PLOS ONE (2007)

408 Citations

Global Genetic Population Structure of Bacillus anthracis

Matthew N. Van Ert;W Ryan Easterday;Lynn Y Huynh;Richard T. Okinaka;Richard T. Okinaka.
PLOS ONE (2007)

403 Citations

Yersinia pestis and the Plague of Justinian 541-543 AD: a genomic analysis

David M. Wagner;Jennifer Klunk;Michaela Harbeck;Alison Devault.
Lancet Infectious Diseases (2014)

380 Citations

Anthrax molecular epidemiology and forensics: using the appropriate marker for different evolutionary scales.

Paul Keim;Matthew N. Van Ert;Talima Pearson;Amy J. Vogler.
Infection, Genetics and Evolution (2004)

357 Citations

Yersinia pestis DNA from Skeletal Remains from the 6th Century AD Reveals Insights into Justinianic Plague

Michaela Harbeck;Lisa Seifert;Stephanie Hänsch;Stephanie Hänsch;David M. Wagner.
PLOS Pathogens (2013)

222 Citations

Francisella tularensis in the United States

Jason Farlow;David M. Wagner;Meghan Dukerich;Miles Stanley.
Emerging Infectious Diseases (2005)

208 Citations

Phylogeography of Francisella tularensis : Global Expansion of a Highly Fit Clone

Amy J. Vogler;Dawn Birdsell;Lance B. Price;Jolene R. Bowers.
Journal of Bacteriology (2009)

179 Citations

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