D-Index & Metrics Best Publications

D-Index & Metrics

Discipline name D-index D-index (Discipline H-index) only includes papers and citation values for an examined discipline in contrast to General H-index which accounts for publications across all disciplines. Citations Publications World Ranking National Ranking
Economics and Finance D-index 85 Citations 150,438 143 World Ranking 100 National Ranking 80

Research.com Recognitions

Awards & Achievements

2018 - Member of the National Academy of Sciences

2017 - Nobel Memorial Prize laureates in Economics for his contributions to behavioural economics".

2017 - Nobel Prize for his contributions to behavioural economics

2016 - Distinguished Fellow of the American Economic Association

2012 - Fellows of the Econometric Society

2009 - Fellow of the American Finance Association (AFA)

2000 - Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Overview

What is he best known for?

The fields of study he is best known for:

  • Law
  • Finance
  • Microeconomics

Richard H. Thaler mostly deals with Microeconomics, Prospect theory, Loss aversion, Positive economics and Actuarial science. His Microeconomics research is multidisciplinary, incorporating elements of Discount points, Community standards and Exponential discounting. His Prospect theory research incorporates elements of Consumer choice, Sunk costs, Representativeness heuristic, Disposition effect and Normative.

His biological study spans a wide range of topics, including Test, Status quo bias and Endowment effect. In his work, Champion, Happiness and Nudge theory is strongly intertwined with Consumer behaviour, which is a subfield of Actuarial science. His Rationality research includes themes of Financial economics and Stock market.

His most cited work include:

  • Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness (6865 citations)
  • Does the Stock Market Overreact (5117 citations)
  • Toward a positive theory of consumer choice (3683 citations)

What are the main themes of his work throughout his whole career to date?

His primary areas of investigation include Behavioral economics, Microeconomics, Financial economics, Actuarial science and Monetary economics. His Behavioral economics research is multidisciplinary, incorporating perspectives in Corporate finance, Rationality, Positive economics, Bounded rationality and Choice architecture. His research in Microeconomics intersects with topics in Simple and Expected utility hypothesis.

His work in Financial economics addresses subjects such as Stock market, which are connected to disciplines such as Portfolio, Framing and Equity premium puzzle. Richard H. Thaler studies Actuarial science, namely Mental accounting. His Monetary economics study integrates concerns from other disciplines, such as Earnings, Dividend policy and Great Depression.

He most often published in these fields:

  • Behavioral economics (26.94%)
  • Microeconomics (21.22%)
  • Financial economics (18.37%)

What were the highlights of his more recent work (between 2011-2021)?

  • Behavioral economics (26.94%)
  • Choice architecture (8.16%)
  • Positive economics (11.84%)

In recent papers he was focusing on the following fields of study:

His primary areas of study are Behavioral economics, Choice architecture, Positive economics, Public economics and Incentive. Richard H. Thaler combines subjects such as Nudge theory, Cognitive science and Pension with his study of Choice architecture. His work in Pension covers topics such as Private sector which are related to areas like Actuarial science.

Richard H. Thaler has researched Positive economics in several fields, including Rationality, Public policy, Paternalism and Loss aversion. His research investigates the connection between Rationality and topics such as Subject that intersect with issues in Prospect theory. His Prospect theory research is included under the broader classification of Microeconomics.

Between 2011 and 2021, his most popular works were:

  • The Endowment Effect, Loss Aversion, and Status Quo Bias (632 citations)
  • Misbehaving: The Making of Behavioral Economics (382 citations)
  • Should Governments Invest More in Nudging (211 citations)

In his most recent research, the most cited papers focused on:

  • Law
  • Finance
  • Microeconomics

Behavioral economics, Incentive, Positive economics, Actuarial science and Prospect theory are his primary areas of study. The concepts of his Behavioral economics study are interwoven with issues in Choice architecture, Public relations, Rationality and Making-of. His Incentive study combines topics in areas such as Rational expectations, Football and Market value.

His Positive economics study combines topics from a wide range of disciplines, such as Status quo bias, Anomaly, Endowment effect and Loss aversion. His work carried out in the field of Actuarial science brings together such families of science as Simple, Expected utility hypothesis, Positive political theory, Stochastic game and Risk aversion. His study connects Discount points and Prospect theory.

This overview was generated by a machine learning system which analysed the scientist’s body of work. If you have any feedback, you can contact us here.

Best Publications

Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness

Richard H. Thaler;Cass R. Sunstein.
(2008)

17129 Citations

Does the Stock Market Overreact

Werner F. M. De Bondt;Richard Thaler.
Journal of Finance (1985)

8454 Citations

Toward a positive theory of consumer choice

Richard H. Thaler.
Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (1980)

7908 Citations

Mental Accounting and Consumer Choice

Richard H. Thaler.
Marketing Science (2008)

7783 Citations

Anomalies: The Endowment Effect, Loss Aversion, and Status Quo Bias

Daniel Kahneman;Jack L. Knetsch;Richard H. Thaler.
Journal of Economic Perspectives (1991)

6648 Citations

Experimental Tests of the Endowment Effect and the Coase Theorem

Daniel Kahneman;Jack L. Knetsch;Richard H. Thaler.
Journal of Political Economy (1990)

5811 Citations

A survey of behavioral finance

Nicholas Barberis;Richard Thaler.
Research Papers in Economics (2003)

4779 Citations

Fairness as a Constraint on Profit Seeking: Entitlements in the Market

Daniel Kahneman;Jack L. Knetsch;Richard H. Thaler.
The American Economic Review (1986)

4762 Citations

Mental accounting matters

Richard H. Thaler.
Journal of Behavioral Decision Making (1999)

4298 Citations

MYOPIC LOSS AVERSION AND THE EQUITY PREMIUM PUZZLE

Shlomo Benartzi;Richard H Thaler.
Quarterly Journal of Economics (1995)

3934 Citations

Best Scientists Citing Richard H. Thaler

George Loewenstein

George Loewenstein

Carnegie Mellon University

Publications: 112

Bruno S. Frey

Bruno S. Frey

University of Basel

Publications: 108

David Laibson

David Laibson

Harvard University

Publications: 99

John A. List

John A. List

University of Chicago

Publications: 81

Ernst Fehr

Ernst Fehr

University of Zurich

Publications: 78

James J. Choi

James J. Choi

Yale University

Publications: 73

David A. Hirshleifer

David A. Hirshleifer

University of California, Irvine

Publications: 73

Brigitte C. Madrian

Brigitte C. Madrian

Brigham Young University

Publications: 70

Colin F. Camerer

Colin F. Camerer

California Institute of Technology

Publications: 65

Avanidhar Subrahmanyam

Avanidhar Subrahmanyam

University of California, Los Angeles

Publications: 64

Thorsten Hens

Thorsten Hens

University of Zurich

Publications: 63

Elke U. Weber

Elke U. Weber

Princeton University

Publications: 57

Olivia S. Mitchell

Olivia S. Mitchell

University of Pennsylvania

Publications: 56

Jason F. Shogren

Jason F. Shogren

University of Wyoming

Publications: 56

Haim Levy

Haim Levy

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Publications: 53

Profile was last updated on December 6th, 2021.
Research.com Ranking is based on data retrieved from the Microsoft Academic Graph (MAG).
The ranking d-index is inferred from publications deemed to belong to the considered discipline.

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